Main sessions
Workshops
Training Sessions
Networking Sessions
Wellness Programming & Socials
Showcase and "Ask an Expert" Sessions

Main Sessions

FCM welcomes Berry Vrbanovic, Mayor of Kitchener and former FCM president, as the Master of Ceremonies for the 2021 SCC.


Tuesday, October 19

Keynote: Dr. Deborah McGregor
Climate action in Canada: A discussion on reconciliation, Indigenous justice, and nature-based solutions

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Indigenous leadership forms an essential part of achieving climate justice in Canada.  Involvement of Indigenous peoples necessitates dialogue on rights, governance, knowledges, justice, legal traditions and coexistence with nature.  My presentation will explore how these themes merge to generate a path forward for nourishing planetary health.

Biography

Keynote: Dr. Deborah McGregor

Dr. Deborah McGregor (Anishinaabe), Associate Professor, holds the Canadian Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice. She is cross appointed to Osgoode Hall Law School and Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change (EUC) at York University. Professor McGregor's research has focused on Indigenous knowledge systems and their various applications in diverse contexts including water and environmental governance, environmental justice, forest policy, and management, and sustainable development. Her research has been published in a variety of national and international journals and she has delivered numerous public and academic presentations relating to Indigenous knowledge systems, governance and sustainability. She co-edited Indigenous Peoples and Autonomy: Insights for a Global Age with Mario Blaser, Ravi De Costa, and William Coleman (2010). She is co-editor (with Alan Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere and Crystal Migwans) of the Anishinaabewin conference proceedings series. You can find out more on Dr. McGregor’s research and work at : https://iejproject.info.yorku.ca


Wednesday, October 20

Expert Panel: What's next for communities in our path to net zero?
Moderated by Carole Saab

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Panelists

Terri Lynn Morrison
Director of Communications and Strategic Partnerships, Indigenous Clean Energy

Ben Geselbracht
Councillor, City of Nanaimo, BC.


Thursday, October 21

Keynote: Dr. Lena Chan
Growing a city in nature – Singapore's story

11:15 a.m. – 11:35 p.m.

Dr. Lena Chan will share her experience in transforming Singapore into a City in Nature and how it is conserving its biodiversity. This work involves a major change towards nature-based solutions and is the primary response to overcome biodiversity loss, climate change, and COVID-19. Dr. Chan will also share how Singapore, and cities like Montreal and Edmonton, have applied a City Biodiversity Index (CBI), also called the Singapore Index on Cities’ Biodiversity (SI), to evaluate and monitor biodiversity conservation efforts at the city level.

Biography

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Dr. Lena Chan is the Senior Director of the International Biodiversity Conservation Division, National Parks Board of Singapore. She obtained her M. Sc. from McGill University in Montreal and her Ph. D. from Imperial College London in London, England. Dr. Chan is a representative for the National Focal Point (NFP) for the Convention on Biological Diversity, a governing board member of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity, co-chair of the World Economic Forum Global Commission on BiodiverCities by 2030, co-chair of the ICLEI City with Nature Knowledge & Research Hub, and a member of the Biophilic Cities Network’s Advisory Board.

Dr. Chan has worked on several projects, including the development and updating of the Singapore Index on Cities’ Biodiversity (SI), drafting the NParks’ Nature Conservation Masterplan (NCMP), and supervising the Pulau Tekong Coastal Protection and Mangrove Enhancement project. She has published scientific papers on ecology, parasitology and women, and the environment. She has also co-written educational books on conservation biology and co-edited supplements, including a biodiversity survey of the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve in Singapore, published in 2019, and a biodiversity survey of the Central Nature Reserve, published in the peer-reviewed journal “Gardens’ Bulletin Singapore” in 1997.

Panel discussion: Applying lessons from Singapore to Canada
Moderated by Dr. Alison Shaw, Executive Director, Action on Climate Team, Simon Fraser University Vancouver

11:35 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Panelists

Dr. Lena Chan 
Senior Director, International Biodiversity Conservation Division, National Parks Board (NParks) of Singapour, Singapore National Parks Board

Francois Crouteau
Councilor for the City of Montreal and Mayor of the Rosemont – La Petite-Patrie borough


Workshops

Workshops run two hours in length and are concurrent with the training sessions. Participants do not need to pre-register but must understand they will not be able to participate in any concurrent training sessions.


Tuesday, October 19

Transforming homes across Canada through local financing programs

1 – 1:50 p.m.

Municipalities and their partners are helping drive deep greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions across Canada by offering local financing programs for home energy upgrades. These innovative programs offer financing and other services for residents to make their homes more energy-efficient, comfortable, and affordable.

In this session, you’ll learn more about how these programs work and how FCM can support you in designing and delivering a program that works for your local context. You’ll also hear from municipal leaders across the country about how they have designed programs that meet their community’s needs and their local climate change goals.

Guest presenters:

  • Hilary Carlson, HG Controls Specialist, City of Saskatoon 
  • Dave Roewade, Project Manager, City of Kingston 

Moderator:

  • Yvonne Ritchie, Project Officer, Capacity Development, FCM
  • Jasmine Bradet, Project Officer, Funding Services, FCM

Designing for natural infrastructure benefits

1 – 1:50 p.m.

Green infrastructure is a key component of effective municipal climate adaptation strategies. Its implementation can lead to improved stormwater management, a reduced urban heat island effect and more livable communities.

Despite the many potential benefits, many local governments struggle to plan or implement green infrastructure solutions to benefit service delivery or reduce climate change challenges.

Join the Green Infrastructure Foundation (GIF) and Ontario Parks Association (OPA) for training on reimagined municipal spaces with green infrastructure installations. The workshop will also offer insight into valuation techniques that capture the benefits of green infrastructure, including those not typically produced by grey infrastructure alternatives

Guest presenters:

  • Rohan Lilauwala, Program Manager, Green Infrastructure Foundation
  • Paul Ronan, Executive Director, Ontario Parks Association 

Moderators:

  • Dustin Carey, Capacity Building Officer, FCM

Net-zero community design

2 –  2:50 p.m.

This session will profile GMF’s recently released Towards a Net Zero Community – 10 lessons from Blatchford, Edmonton guidebook, a free resource about a municipal-led sustainable community development and a 2020 Inspire Award Winner. Drawing on Edmonton’s experience, this workshop will tell the story of Blatchford that set a goal for net-zero and the lessons learned along the way. You’ll hear the story of Blatchford and how it’s using conservation, efficiency, and renewables to reach its carbon neutral goals. 

A spotlight will also be placed on how the adoption of "people first” design guidelines and how itis helping them the city build a walkable, attractive and safe neighborhood. 

We will also explore how FCM can support you to start on the road of towards net-zero community design.

Guest presenters:

  • Christian Felske, Director of Renewable Energy Systems, City of Edmonton
  • Anjali Varghese, Manager of Planning and Infrastructure, Blatchford redevelopment, City of Edmonton

Moderator:

  • Noémie De Vuyst, Advisor, Programs Outreach, FCM
  • Paulina Ascencio, Project Coordinator, Capacity Development, GMF

Engaging communities in urban forest planning with Tree Canada

2 - 2:50 p.m.

One of the key elements of urban forest management planning is effective public consultation. Engaging communities where they live can foster more meaningful, reciprocal, and inclusive relationships with our urban forests, and the communities and governing bodies who care for them. This panel will discuss various elements for consideration in public consultation processes such as civic engagement, types and functions of stewardship, and cultivating environmental ethics and meaningful relationships among urban stakeholders.

Guest presenters:

  • Martha Copestake, Urban Forester, City of Ottawa
  • Dr. Erika Svendson, Research Social Scientist, USDA Forest Service

Wednesday, October 20

Climate change and community facilities: solutions for small municipalities

1 - 1:50 p.m.

This workshop will present a pathway for small and rural municipalities to advance greenhouse gases (GHG) reductions in their community facilities. The session will start with an overview on creating an asset management inventory to deepen understanding of energy use and to highlight GHG reduction opportunities. We will explore how GMF’s Community Buildings Retrofit (CBR) initiative and Infrastructure Canada’s Green and Inclusive Buildings program (GIBC) can help drive deeper reductions in buildings energy use. This workshop will also share case studies on how small rural municipalities have advanced leadership and action on managing their recreational facilities and integrating climate change mitigation in the planning of these buildings’ retrofits.

Guest presenters:

  • Maéva Ambros, Project Manager, Center for Expertise and Research in Urban Infrastructures (CERIU) 
  • Adeniyi Adeaga, Energy Manager, Foothills County, AB
  • Matthew Baird, Director Resilient and Innovative Communities, Infrastructure Canada

Moderators:

  • Marcel Roquette, Project Officer, Capacity Development, FCM
  • Emilie Marleau, Outreach Advisor, FCM

Parks, greenspace, and urban protected areas

1 – 1:50 p.m.

Guest presenters:

  • Stephanie Stanov, Project Manager, Park People
  • Adri Stark, Project Manager, Park People 

Moderators:

  • Jessie Grainger, Knowledge Management & Learning Officer, GMF

The pathway to net-zero home energy retrofits

2 – 2:50 p.m.

To achieve Canada’s net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target by 2050, all existing homes will need to be retrofitted to near net-zero emissions in the next few decades. This requires new policies, tools and partnerships to transform the pace and performance of residential retrofits across Canada.

Join our expert panel of municipal, federal and industry representatives to learn about the top priorities on the pathway towards net-zero retrofits and opportunities available for municipal leadership. Then join the facilitated networking session at 3 - 3:50 p.m. EST for an interactive discussion that will build on the learnings from this session.

Guest presenters:

  • Sonja Winkelmann, Director, Net Zero Energy Housing, Canadian Home Builders’ Association
  • Lisa Dockman, Residential Energy Transition Program Manager, City of Edmonton
  • Patrick Langevin , Project Lead and Facilitator, Local Energy Efficiency Partnerships (LEEP), Natural Resources Canada
  • Mathieu Gillet, Head of business development, Écohabitation
  • Ralph Torrie, Director of Research, Corporate Knights

Moderators:

  • Robin Goldstein, Capacity Development Advisor, FCM

Integrating climate considerations into your municipality’s asset management practices

2 - 2:50 p.m.

Municipalities deliver essential services and infrastructure that support Canadians’ quality of life. From the roads and bridges that keep people and goods moving, to the treatment plants that make our water safe to drink, local governments are building better lives for residents.

To continue providing reliable services, municipalities are adopting asset management practices that help prioritize infrastructure investment while balancing cost, risk, and levels of service expectations.

As the impacts of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent across Canada, communities of all sizes are now faced with the challenge of integrating this key factor in their planning and decision-making process.

This session will highlight best practices from municipalities that have improved their asset management practices by integrating climate considerations and will explore how these solutions can be replicated in communities across the country. 

Guest presenters:

  • Kim Fowler, Manager, Long Range Planning, Sustainability and Energy, Regional District of Nanaimo
  • Duane Nicol, CAO, City of Selkirk
  • Chris Chen, Executive Director, Asset Management Ontario

Moderators:

  • Michael Burt, Project Director, Municipal Asset Management Program, FCM
  • Emilie Marleau, Outreach Advisor, FCM

Thursday, October 21

The capacity to act: what it takes to create local change for climate change

1 - 1:50 p.m.

This session will discuss the readiness and capacity of the municipal sector to propel the implementation of Canada’s emissions reduction commitments and pathways toward net-zero emissions.

Leaders in capacity development support and municipal practitioners who have advanced a number of communities across Canada will share their experience, insights, and strategies to keep building community competencies and capabilities to succeed. Learn how a foundation of key support programs, partnerships, systemic change strategies and self-financing approaches can advance your tangible community projects.

Guest presenters:

  • Mark Boysen, General Manager, Corporate Services at Cowichan Valley Regional District
  • Julius Lindsay, Climate Change, Resilience, & Sustainability Manager, City of Richmond Hill
  • Alain Desjardins, Director General, Ville de Candiac
  • Megan Meaney, Executive Director, ICLEI Canada
  • Tonja Leach, Executive Director, QUEST
  • Sarah Brown, Executive Director, NWTAC

Moderators:

  • Devin Causley, Manager Capacity Building, FCM

Indigenous-led conservation and municipal partnerships

1 – 1:50 p.m.

Local communities and Indigenous Peoples are specifically referred to in the United Nation’s Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as having a unique role to play with regards to protecting and conserving biological and cultural diversity. In a Canadian context, collaboration between local government and Indigenous Nations also holds the greatest potential for true reconciliation, and long-term sustainable development. This workshop will explore the challenges and opportunities for municipalities and Indigenous governments to create mutually beneficial relationships through an Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs) model or regional development.

Guest presenters:

  • Eli Enns, IISAAK OLAM Foundation

Moderators:

  • Monica Shore,  IISAAK OLAM Foundation

Elder Welcome:

  • Larry McDermott, Executive Director, Plenty Canada

Customizing energy solutions for your community 

2 – 2:50 p.m.

Tackling energy use in municipal and community buildings is a crucial step in achieving a low-carbon future. Using GMF’s Municipal Energy Roadmap, municipalities can find cost-effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in their buildings, while maximizing benefits like job creation and community well-being.

In this session, you’ll explore how to use the Roadmap to prioritize energy solutions for your local context and hear how other municipal leaders have applied these solutions. You’ll also hear about a new learning opportunity that FCM is offering for municipal staff to explore these ideas further and to connect with peers on implementing energy initiatives.

Guest presenters:

  • Abhishek Chakraborti, Senior Environmental Program Manager (Energy Transition), City of Edmonton
  • Craig Stephens, Specialist, Energy & Environment, Town of Caledon

Moderators:

  • Yvonne Ritchie, Project Officer, Capacity Development, FCM

Funding and municipal support for sustainable affordable housing

2 - 2:50 p.m.

The need for affordable housing across the country is significant – from large cities to small communities. Most of the affordable housing stock is over 25 years old representing a critical opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the retrofit of existing affordable housing units, or through the construction of energy efficient new builds. This contributes to Canada’s climate goals, improves affordability, and reduces energy poverty for residents.

Join this interactive workshop to learn about stackable funding available to support sustainable affordable housing retrofits and new builds in your community. You will also hear examples of the ways that municipalities can support these important projects.

Guest presenters:

  • Spencer Andres, Senior Planner and Project Manager CitySpaces Consulting Ltd.
  • Sandie Price, Outreach Representative, Partnerships and Promotions, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  • Kathy Moore, Mayor, City of Rossland, BC

Moderators:

  • Emilie Hayes, Capacity Development Advisor, FCM
  • Jessica Golden, Outreach Advisor, FCM

Training sessions

Training sessions run four to six hours in length and are concurrent with the workshop sessions. Participants must pre-register for these training sessions and understand they will not be able to participate in any concurrent workshops.


Fostering sustainable behaviour

Daily Tuesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 21 from 1:00 - 2:50 p.m.

*This training session will be delivered exclusively in the English-language. Training material for participants will be available in French and English languages.

This workshop provides a comprehensive introduction to community-based social marketing and how it’s being applied throughout the world to foster behaviours that protect the environment.

Participants will receive in-depth exposure to community-based social marketing and build the knowledge needed to design and evaluate their own social marketing programs. Further, participants will have extensive opportunities to discuss the application of community-based social marketing to the design of actual programs.

Workshop attendees will learn the five steps of community-based social marketing (selecting behaviours, identifying barriers, developing strategies, conducting pilots, and broad-scale implementation) and be exposed to numerous case studies illustrating its use. 

Guest presenters:

  • Doug McKenzie-Mohr, Executive Director, Community Based Social Marketing

Biography

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For over three decades, Dr. Doug McKenzie-Mohr has been working to incorporate behaviour change into the design of environmental programs. He is the founder of community-based social marketing (CBSM), an approach that has been used globally in thousands of sustainability initiatives. He is the author and co-author of three books on CBSM. One of these books, “Fostering Sustainable Behaviour,” has been recommended by Time Magazine and has become requisite reading in programs protecting the environment. Doug is also the author of the Fostering Behavior Change Minute newsletter, which is read weekly by 20,000 subscribers. His work has been featured in the New York Times and he is the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s inaugural award for innovation in environmental psychology. He is also the recipient of the World Social Marketing conference’s inaugural award for contributions to the field of social marketing. A former Professor of Psychology, he is currently an adjunct professor at the University of Victoria and Royal Roads University (in Victoria, Canada). More than 75,000 program managers have attended his workshops.

The opportunity of natural assets management

Tuesday, October 19 from 1:00 - 2:50 p.m.

Across Canada, infrastructure is aging. Its capital and operating costs are rising, municipal service delivery is strained, and many ecosystems are in declining health. Climate change exacerbates these challenges. 

Healthy, well-managed natural assets can form part of the solution. Local government can provide those solutions, such as stormwater management, at lower capital and operating costs when compared to engineered alternatives. Natural assets can also store carbon, support biodiversity, and provide other benefits on which large and small communities depend.

Join this workshop session to learn about:

  • The evolving practice of municipal natural asset management.
  • Inspiring examples from across Canada in communities large and small.The first steps you can take.

Guest presenters:

  • Michelle Molnar, Technical Director, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative
  • Nikita Bhalla, Engineering and Environmental Advisor, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative
  • Donna Chiarelli, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative

Biography

Michelle Molnar

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Michelle Molnar is the Technical Director of the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative, as well as an Environmental Economist and Policy Analyst at the David Suzuki Foundation. Her work focuses primarily on the conservation of natural capital using tools such as ecological economics, policy analysis, and public outreach. She is the author of several natural capital valuation reports, a past President of the Canadian Society for Ecological Economics and has served on the B.C. government’s Climate Solutions and Clean Growth Advisory Council.

Nikita Bhalla

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Nikita Bhalla comes from a background in civil structural engineering and asset management. As an Engineering & Environment Advisor at MNAI, she provides technical assistance in the field of natural asset management. Her earlier work, as a contractor to TransLink, supported various asset management initiatives including capital planning, investment prioritization and asset criticality.

Delving into natural asset management: service levels, carbon and risk

Wednesday, October 20 from 1:00 - 2:50 p.m.

*This session is advanced training on natural asset management. Attendees should either have strong working knowledge of or practical experience in Natural Asset Management, or have attended the first training session, “The opportunity of natural assets management”,  held on Tuesday, October 19th.

Local governments in Canada are turning to municipal natural asset management to build climate-resilient communities while also meeting climate change action targets.

Building on the fundamental concepts from the first training session, this training workshop looks at the deeper, more technical aspects of Canada’s natural asset management.

Join this session for a more detailed look at technical aspects including:

  • How local governments can consider determining levels of services for natural assets, including data requirements and current limitations.
  • Opportunities and limitations of natural assets in storing or sequestering carbon and their potential to avoid emissions from grey infrastructure.
  • The impact of climate change on natural assets and associated services in risk assessments, based on recent research and projects by the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative.

Guest presenters:

  • Michelle Molnar, Technical Director, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative
  • Nikita Bhalla, Engineering and Environmental Advisor, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative
  • Donna Chiarelli, Municipal Natural Assets Initiative

Zero emissions 2050 – vision to implementation in your community

Wednesday, October 20 – Thursday, October 21 from 1:00 - 2:50 p.m.

Local leaders from communities of all sizes know they can create jobs and build strong communities while getting on a path to net-zero emissions by 2050. But how exactly? Join us to work on a compelling vision for a low carbon future and ‘backcast’ the big dial-turning actions to get there, such as electric mobility and zero-emission buildings. Blending long-term visioning with short-term implementation guidance, this workshop will provide tools to help you succeed, including:

  • Communicating with different audiences
  • Embedding a climate lens across municipal processes
  • Funding climate action

Complete the optional homework and get the ‘Community Climate Action Implementation Certificate.’

Guest presenters:

  • Dale Littlejohn, Executive Director, Community Energy Association (CEA)
  • Maya Chorobik, Director of Climate Leadership, Community Energy Association (CEA)
  • Megan Lohmann, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Community Energy Association (CEA)
  • Patricia Bell, Director of Capacity Development, Community Energy Association (CEA)
  • Jennifer Grebeldinger, Communications Lead, Community Energy Association (CEA)

Biography

Dale Littlejohn

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Dale Littlejohn leads a team of 20 professionals as Executive Director for the Community Energy Association (CEA). Dale is a senior advisor to local governments developing actions, calculating their impacts, and implementing plans to save energy and emissions in their operations and communities. Prior to joining the Community Energy Association, Dale was a Senior Manager in the consulting practice of Deloitte where he led corporate strategy, technology strategy and sustainability projects globally.

Maya Chorobik

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Maya Chorobik is the Director of Climate Leadership with the Community Energy Association (CEA). Maya has been with CEA for 4 years and, prior to that, worked in local government. Maya’s work spans all areas of CEA, including developing climate and energy plans, facilitating peer networks, coaching for staff and elected officials, and working with local government on policy and project implementation. Maya is the facilitator for the BC Municipal Climate Leadership Council (BCMCLC), which provides education and peer networking to locally elected officials committed to climate action. As part of this role, Maya is coordinating the development of the BC Climate Leaders Playbook, a resource designed to engage elected officials on high impact climate action.

Megan Lohmann

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Megan Lohmann is Director of Strategic Initiatives for the Community Energy Association (CEA). Megan has over a decade of experience working with local governments and communities in developing energy and emissions plans as well as facilitating implementation of energy initiatives. Megan has been successful in leveraging funding to facilitate high-impact initiatives and collaborating across governments, utilities, and private sectors. Megan offers strong community engagement skills and considerable experience with local government officials, the public, and Indigenous communities.

Patricia Bell

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With over twenty-five years of experience in regional, urban, and environmental planning, Patricia Bell is a planning professional with an emphasis on sustainable development. Patricia has completed projects on community, regional, transportation and air quality planning, demand-side management, urban revitalization, district energy systems, energy efficiency in buildings, and agriculture. She developed the Community Energy Management course and delivers it through the BC Institute of Technology.

Jennifer Grebeldinger

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Jen Grebeldinger is a communications specialist. Over the past 12 years she has engaged communities and facilitated change by animating ideas and creating engaging materials for print and web. Jen has spent most of her professional career with innovative organizations that emphasize community and stakeholder engagement. This experience has allowed Jen to cultivate skills to create holistic outreach strategies in support of project goals. With training and practical experience in graphic design, she is also skillful in creating print and web assets to support communications and outreach plans.


Networking Sessions


Tuesday, October 19

Project Accelerator with MaRS Urban Innovation Lab

3 - 3:50 p.m.

Do you or your municipality have an ambitious project idea but are unsure how to maximize impact? Are you unsure how to secure funding and partnerships?   

FCM’s Project Accelerator (PA), led by the Inclusive Smart Cities team from MaRS Urban Innovation Lab, will help advance your innovative sustainability projects from ideation and planning to project readiness and launch. The facilitated workshop series will help participants develop innovative municipal project ideas with design thinking and systemic design approaches.   

The workshop series will be presented, here, during this session at the 2021 SCC conference. Come meet the PA team to discuss ideas, get initial feedback and to apply for the first PA cohort! The first facilitated workshop series officially launches November 2021.

Guest presenters:

  • Sacha Sud, MaRS Discovery District
  • Jerry Koh, MaRS Discovery District

Networking session for communities advancing equity and reconciliation in climate action

3 - 3:50 p.m.


Wednesday, October 20

2022 Sustainable Communities Awards Information Session

3 - 3:50 p.m.

Guest presenters:

  • Devin LaFleche, Sustainability & Transit Coordinator, Town of Cochrane
  • Yves Hennekens, President, YHC Environnement

Group discussion: The pathway to net-zero home energy retrofits

Moderated by Janice Ashworth

3 - 3:50 p.m.


Thursday, October 21

Partners for Climate Protection members meet-up

3 - 3:50 p.m.

Networking session for small, rural and remote communities.

3 - 3:50 p.m.


Wellness Programming & Socials


Wellness programming: short film screenings

Daily Tuesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 21 from 10:00 - 10:50 a.m.

Showcase health break

Daily Tuesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 21 from 12:15 – 1:00 p.m.

Open networking

Tuesday, October 19 – Wednesday, October 20 from 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.


Social Event (Trivia)


Wednesday, October 20 from 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.


Showcase and "Ask an Expert" Sessions


Daily Tuesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 21 from 10:00 - 10:50 a.m.

© 2021 Federation of Canadian Municipalities