August 7, 2018

The following 26 capital projects have been approved for funding through two infrastructure programs funded by the Government of Canada and delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities: the Green Municipal Fund (GMF) and the Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program (MCIP). Funding for these new initiatives amounts to $36,989,130.

Approved projects under GMF: 

Lead applicant, municipality and province Project title and description Approved funding amount
City of Surrey, British Columbia Clayton Community Hub $5,750,000
CityHousing Hamilton and City of Hamilton, Ontario Ken Soble Tower transformation $5,750,000
City of Kawartha Lakes, Ontario Innovative net-zero energy mixed use development building $5,750,000
Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Ontario Cogeneration at the Kitchener, Waterloo and Galt wastewater treatment plants $5,750,000

Approved projects under MCIP:

Lead applicant, municipality and province Project title and description Approved funding amount
City of Medicine Hat, Alberta Southern Alberta Clean Transportation Network: EV charging from peaks to prairies $750,000
Regional District of Central Kootenay, British Columbia Regional Residential Energy Efficiency and Retrofit Program (RRRP) $387,500
Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia Campbell Mountain Landfill biocover - Phase 1 $152,800
City of Port Alberni, British Columbia Coal Creek storm sewer separation project - Phase 2 $750,000
City of Richmond, British Columbia Deep GHG emissions and energy reductions at Richmond's Main Library and Cultural Centre $750,000
City of Victoria, British Columbia All ages and abilities bicycle network infrastructure project $750,000
City of Thompson, Manitoba Active transportation $640,000
Town of Baie Verte, Newfoundland and Labrador Regional community centre retrofit of Baie Verte High $750,000
City of Dieppe, New Brunswick Construction of a new dike $750,000
City of Moncton, New Brunswick Centennial Park pool relocation $750,000
Cape Breton Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia Cape Breton Regional Municipality wastewater sludge anaerobic digestion with combined heat and power $750,000
Municipality of Bayham, Ontario Port Burwell climate change adaptation infrastructure $778,400
City of Kitchener, Ontario RBJ Schlegel Park - green infrastructure initiative $750,000
Town of Milton, Ontario Transition of municipal ice resurfacer fleet to electric vehicles $308,900
City of North Bay, Ontario North Bay Community Energy Park $750,000
Region of Peel, Ontario Mississauga Road - low-impact development stormwater project $925,600
County of Simcoe, Ontario County of Simcoe Archives - energy-efficiency measures and rooftop solar $585,730
Evergreen and City of Toronto, Ontario Evergreen Brick Works: Transitioning to a carbon-neutral campus $1,000,000
City of Vaughan, Ontario Rivermede Road / Bowes Road low-impact development retrofit pilot project $299,900
Regional Municipality of York, Ontario Reducing GHG emissions by implementing anti-idling technologies for York Region paramedic fleet vehicles $573,100
City of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan Public transit extended service hours trial $87,200
Town of Shellbrook, Saskatchewan Improving the energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions of the Affinity Credit Union Recreation Centre $750,000

Source: FCM


City of Surrey, BC
Clayton Community Hub
Water
GMF grant: $750,000
GMF loan: $5,000,000

The City of Surrey will build a Passive House community hub that will integrate arts programs, the library, recreation and outdoor space. A rapidly growing population in Clayton Heights and the need to provide civic services and amenities to surrounding neighbourhoods fueled the decision to undertake this project. The initiative demonstrates the city’s commitment to its Sustainability Charter, which outlines a 50-year vision of sustainability, focusing on themes such as the built environment and economic prosperity.

Innovative aspect

  • The hub will be the largest Passive House in the world at 4,925 m2.

Environmental benefits

  • This facility will reduce CO2 emissions by 98 per cent.
  • The project significantly improves the net-zero capabilities of the city.
  • The Passive House design will eliminate the need to heat the complex with fossil fuels and will allow the city to rely on high-efficiency heat pumps.
  • The facility will have a well-insulated exterior that is designed with extreme care to eliminate thermal conductivity, including triple-glassed, low-energy windows and natural ventilation.

Economic benefits

  • The new facility will have reduced energy costs.
  • There will be an increase in local employment during the construction phase.

Social benefits

  • There is a strong alignment between the project and existing municipal policies, programs and strategies.
  • The project will enhance quality of life and public health, and provide a sense of civic ownership and pride.
  • The project includes a strategy to share lessons learned and improve environmental behaviour.

City of Hamilton, ON, and CityHousing Hamilton
Ken Soble Tower transformation
Energy
GMF grant: $750,000
GMF loan: $5,000,000

In response to municipal needs for affordable housing, CityHousing Hamilton Corporation will create North America’s first Passive House (PH) retrofit of a 50-year-old high-rise apartment building. The retrofit of the tower will meet EnerPHit certification requirements (the PH retrofit standard). This retrofit will provide residents with improved comfort, health and control of their indoor environments, while dramatically reducing the environmental footprint of the building.

With over 6,000 households on the City of Hamilton’s community housing waitlist, the rehabilitation of this 146-unit building is critical to providing safe, high-quality housing for those most in need. It will also position the Ken Soble Tower as a landmark initiative, kick-starting a new era of affordable housing stewardship in Hamilton and beyond. The building’s energy consumption will be measured and monitored over two years post-construction in order to track the success of the retrofit.

Innovative aspect

  • The project qualifies as one of approximately 10 multi-residential retrofits in the world registered with International PH Certification.

Environmental benefit

  • The project will reduce energy consumption by 90 per cent and greenhouse gas emissions by 70 per cent.

Economic benefit

  • Savings from the rehabilitated tower are projected to generate a net-positive operating income.

Social benefits

  • This project will help fill the housing gap for low-income seniors in Hamilton.
  • The project’s design is informed by accessibility and aging-in-place principles. The project will support the residents and the neighbourhood through new community spaces and partnerships with social service agencies.

City of Kawartha Lakes, ON
City of Kawartha Lakes innovative net-zero energy mixed-use development building
Energy
GMF grant: $750,000
GMF loan: $5,000,000

The City of Kawartha Lakes is constructing a mixed-use building with net-zero energy capability. The building will integrate public offices and 24 affordable residential units on a remediated brownfield site. The project aligns strongly with the city’s sustainability plans, policies and programs, including its Local Action Plan and The City of Kawartha Lakes Integrated Community Sustainability Plan.

Innovative aspects

  • The city offices and affordable housing will be located under one roof.
  • Energy measures will be installed to help achieve the net-zero energy target.
  • The building will be constructed on a former brownfield site.

Environmental benefits

  • The proposed building will significantly reduce energy consumption, with a reduction target of at least 1,008 GJ per year (a 59 per cent energy reduction) which will reduce CO2 emissions by 40 tonnes per year.
  • The incorporation of bioswales will reduce stormwater runoff by 35 per cent and remove 80 per cent of suspended solids from rainwater runoff.

Social benefits

  • The City of Kawartha Lakes will save approximately $150,000 in annual operating costs by accommodating over 70 city workers that currently use leased office spaces across the city.
  • The project will also help address the community’s high need for affordable housing. There is currently a rental vacancy rate of less than one per cent in the City of Kawartha Lakes.
  • The building’s central location and easy access to public transportation will allow residents to actively engage in community activities.

Regional Municipality of Waterloo, ON
Cogeneration at the Kitchener, Waterloo and Galt wastewater treatment plants
Water
GMF grant: $750,000
GMF loan: $5,000,000

The Region of Waterloo is designing three cogeneration facilities to be constructed at the Kitchener, Galt and Waterloo wastewater treatment plants. These facilities will use biogas, a renewable fuel produced as part of the wastewater process, to produce both heat and electricity that will be used at each respective plant. On average, between 50 and 80 per cent of each plant’s electrical consumption from the grid will be displaced.

Innovative aspect

  • The installation of cogeneration at these wastewater treatment plants will allow the biogas to be used year-round to produce both electricity and supplemental heat.

Economic benefits

  • With the reduction in electricity purchased from the grid, these facilities will contribute to reducing operating costs for the wastewater plants.
  • The approach of using dual fuel engines allows natural gas to be used to maximize the electrical output from each of the engines. This approach reduces the payback period for the investment from approximately 20 years to 10 years.

City of Medicine Hat, AB
Southern Alberta Clean Transportation Network: EV charging from peaks to prairies
Transportation
MCIP grant: $750,000

The Southern Alberta Clean Transportation Network is collaborating with the City of Medicine Hat and other Southern Alberta communities to draw attention to the forward-thinking and innovative collaboration that will inspire further investment in clean energy transportation in the region. This integrated and collaborative approach to reducing emissions and providing electric vehicle charging stations “from peaks to prairies” will provide a catalyst for electric vehicle (EV) adoption and assist the region in maintaining and further establishing economic advantage.  As Alberta transitions toward a diversified energy sector, investment in demonstration projects that support local renewable energy opportunities (e.g. solar, wind) and lead to economic activity (tourism, the clean technology industry, car sales, expanded services opportunities, battery storage opportunities, etc.) will be critical to ensuring that there is capacity, knowledge, skills and collaboration to support that transition.

Innovative aspect

  • Connecting rural communities with clean energy transportation opportunities through the provision of electric vehicle charging stations.

Environmental benefit

  • A commitment to providing energy that is renewable and low-carbon will maximize the impact of this network, resulting in even greater greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions than would be realized with use of the current electrical grid.

Economic benefits

  • The investment will support local renewable energy opportunities and lead to economic activity (tourism, the clean technology industry, car sales, expanded services opportunities, battery storage opportunities, etc.).
  • This project will also ensure that there is capacity, knowledge, skills and collaboration to support the transition to clean energy transportation.

Social benefit

  • Supporting a clean energy transportation network will address some of the key technical and social barriers to electric vehicle adoption.

Regional District of Central Kootenay, BC
Regional Residential Energy Efficiency and Retrofit Program (RRRP)
Energy
MCIP grant: $387,500

The Regional Residential Energy Efficiency and Retrofit Program (RRRP) will be carried out in partnership with the Community Energy Association (CEA), Nelson EcoSave (the Nelson Hydro retrofit program), Fortis BC and BC Hydro. The RRRP will serve a predominantly rural area in the southeast of British Columbia with a population of approximately 60,000. The goals of the RRRP program are to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to make housing more affordable in the region.

Key components of the program include: 1) program start-up (marketing, coordination with areas and directors, and utilities); 2) the Home Energy Retrofit Program (low-interest financing, energy assessments, local “energy ambassadors,” and homeowner education); 3) the New Home Program (builder and community education, materials and policy); and 4) project management (monitoring, evaluation and ongoing coordination). In addition, energy-efficient materials and technologies such as insulation, air sealing kits, and space and water heating systems will be bulk-purchased and installed in retrofits.

Innovative aspect

  • A collaborative greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction partnership will be fostered with utilities, community organizations, financial institutions and municipalities.

Environmental benefits

  • This initiative aims to reduce overall GHG emissions.
  • The project will provide support for municipalities and utilities to achieve their GHG reduction targets.

Economic benefits

  • The project will support skill-building by offering training for builders on how to build more energy-efficient new homes.
  • The initiative aims to improve the local economy through reductions in energy dollars exported, and through energy retrofit activity.

Social benefits

  • One of the targeted outcomes of this project is to make housing more affordable in the region, thereby decreasing the cost of living.
  • The initiative aims to improve the quality of housing stock and provide healthier homes to residents.
  • Benefitting communities will be empowered by an improved understanding and ability to deliver energy retrofit programs within diverse regions and sectors.
  • The project aims to increase social equity and reduced energy poverty, dedicating special attention to social housing.

Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, BC
Campbell Mountain landfill biocover — Phase 1
Waste
MCIP grant: $152,800

The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen (RDOS) is conducting a pilot study at the Campbell Mountain Landfill (CML) to determine an efficient design of biocover to reduce approximately 60 per cent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the landfill. The objective is to utilize a biocover system at the landfill for reducing fugitive methane emissions, as an alternative to installing an active collection system, which would cause significant concern with landfill fires in the dry, hot climate. Using state-of-the-art modelling and measurement techniques, it has been established that the CML is currently generating 757 tonnes of fugitive methane annually, equivalent to 18,925 tonnes of CO2. Pilot studies and small-scale applications at other landfills in British Columbia have demonstrated that biocover is able to control between 75 and 100 per cent of fugitive methane emissions at landfills. Phase 1 of the project is designed to confirm the capacity of an engineered biocover to oxidize methane emissions at the landfill site, and to optimize the biocover composition prior to Phase 2. Phase 2 will be the complete installation of the biocover system — initially onto about an 8-hectare area, with the ultimate size growing to over 26 hectares when closure occurs in 2106. Incorporating stabilized biosolids as an ingredient in biocover has the potential to create beneficial uses for this controversial material that include greening up the landfill surface with a vibrant community of native plants, and beneficially diverting shredded clean wood waste from landfill. This technology would be cost-effective for small or unlined landfills. It would also be effective on larger sites to limit fugitive methane emissions not captured by landfill gas collection.

Innovative aspect

  • To reduce fugitive methane emissions at the landfill, the objective is to utilize a biocover system as an alternative to installing an active collection system — which would cause significant concern with landfill fires in the dry, hot climate.

Environmental benefits

  • Incorporating stabilized biosolids as an ingredient in biocover has the potential to create beneficial uses for this controversial material, including greening up the landfill surface with a vibrant community of native plants, and beneficially diverting shredded clean wood waste from landfill.
  • Phase 1 of the project is designed to confirm the capacity of an engineered biocover to oxidize methane emissions at the landfill site, and to optimize the biocover composition.

Economic benefit

  • Biocover provides a cost-effective way to mitigate fugitive methane emissions from landfills.

Social benefit

  • This initiative offers health benefits to the local community, by mitigating fugitive methane emissions from the landfill.

City of Port Alberni, BC
Coal Creek storm sewer separation project — phase 2
Water
MCIP grant: $750,000

This capital project will help the City of Port Alberni to adapt to flooding related to a changing climate by reducing combined sewerage overflows through the construction of a separate sanitary sewer system that will service 80 hectares located in the Coal Creek region of the city. This project will reduce the number of hectares affected by combined sewer overflow by 16 per cent, capturing effluent from over 70 properties, and will result in a 35 per cent reduction in flow. This project is critical as part of the Liquid Waste Management Plan currently being developed by the City of Port Alberni, as the region faces an increasing number of high water events, which can lead to increased sewer overflow events. Phase 1 of the project was completed in 2016 and included the installation of 300 metres of sanitary sewage main. Design for phase 2 is under way and includes the design of the sanitary sewer main between Fifth and Sixth avenues and the combined sewer separation work that was not completed in phase 1 due to financial constraints.

Innovative aspect

  • Reduced combined sewerage overflows through the construction of a separate sanitary system that will service 80 hectares of land.

Environmental benefits

  • This project aligns with the adaptation objective of preventing sewage from entering waterways, an event that is occurring with more regularity due to the increase in weather events.
  • By reducing the number of overflow events, this project will reduce the amount of untreated water that is entering the inlet, protecting a fish-sensitive area.

Economic benefit

  • Less runoff from rainfall will be directed to the currently stressed wastewater treatment lagoon servicing the municipality, which will make Port Alberni’s wastewater conveyance and treatment infrastructure less vulnerable to potential changes in rainfall characteristics and sea-level rise. This will preserve the capacity of the conveyance system, and reduce the costs associated with the potential impacts of flooding.

Social benefit

  • This initiative will help the City of Port Alberni to adapt to flooding and protect the 600 homes and the elementary school located in the Coal Creek region of the city, by reducing combined sewerage overflows.

City of Richmond, BC
Deep GHG emissions and energy reductions at Richmond’s Main Library and Cultural Centre
Energy
MCIP grant: $750,000

The City of Richmond proposes capital measures to reduce 80 per cent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the city’s Main Library and Cultural Centre. The deep GHG emission and energy reductions will be achieved through the upgrade and replacement of aging mechanical systems and the incorporation of a renewable energy system. The main project objectives are: a) to increase the energy efficiency of the building; b) to reduce the building’s GHG emissions, and c) to improve the operational efficiency of the building’s heating and cooling systems. Major equipment upgrades in the first phase of the project will include replacing the mid-efficiency boiler plant with condensing boilers, changing the large chiller plant to a smaller heat recovery chiller, and adding a heat pump to pre-heat domestic hot water. In the subsequent phase, the city plans to install a renewable energy system, such as a vertical closed loop geo-exchange system, with connections to the heating and cooling systems of the centre. These upgrades will help to improve occupant comfort and overall building operation and will reduce the centre’s GHG emissions and conventional energy use, which will provide added resiliency and reduce operating costs. Completing this project will help the city achieve its 2020 corporate building emissions reduction target of 65 per cent reduction from 2007 levels.

Innovative aspect

  • The city plans to install a renewable energy system, such as a vertical closed loop geo-exchange system, with connections to the heating and cooling systems of the centre.

Environmental benefits

  • With the upgrade and replacement of aging mechanical systems and the incorporation of a renewable energy system, the city aims to reduce GHG emissions by 80 per cent at the Main Library and Cultural Centre.
  • Based on the initial feasibility study and options assessment, it is projected that the capital measures will reduce GHG emissions at the facility by over 200 tonnes of CO2 annually (equal to taking 60 Richmond vehicles off the road for one year).
  • Completing this project will help the city achieve its 2020 corporate building emissions reduction target of 65 per cent reduction from 2007 levels.

Economic benefits

  • Improving the operational efficiency of the building’s heating and cooling systems will offer financial savings to the city in the long term.
  • The project will support local contractors and tradespeople, who will likely be engaged to complete the majority of the required evaluation and design work, construction and commissioning.

Social benefits

  • The Main Library and Cultural Centre is a crucial cultural hub for residents of the City of Richmond, and its continued effective and energy-efficient operation in the near and long term is vital to maintaining the city’s vibrancy and heritage.
  • The planned upgrades will improve occupant comfort.

City of Victoria, BC
All Ages & Abilities Bicycle Network Infrastructure Project
Transportation
MCIP grant: $750,000

The City of Victoria is setting itself to become a 100 per cent renewable energy city by 2050 and preparing for the impacts associated with a changing climate. The city is accelerating low-carbon mobility through investments in high performance and affordable multi-modal transportation systems. As a part of this approach, Victoria is building a network of bicycle routes for all ages and abilities (AAA). Starting in the downtown core and connecting to neighbourhood hubs and village centres, the completed network will enable 75 per cent of the municipality to be within 400 meters of an active transportation corridor. The first phase of implementation focuses on infrastructure in the downtown core – a place with the highest safety concerns and notable gaps in infrastructure for people riding bikes. Using a complete street lens, the city is able to support climate-friendly infrastructure renewal, urban forest management and pedestrian improvements at the same time. As a part of project monitoring, Victoria is participating in a research project with Simon Fraser University to explore the outcomes of infrastructure investment in terms of ridership, safety, and health-related economic benefits. Investments are also being made to encourage and educate road users, including new programs targeted at supporting children and older adults in riding more often.

Innovative aspect

  • The city is seeking to become a 100 per cent renewable energy city by 2050 and is building an entire network of bicycle routes for all ages and abilities (AAA) as a way to accelerate low-carbon mobility options.

Environmental benefits

  • By providing safer cycling infrastructure, the city can reap the benefits of increased mode share, improved air quality and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Reducing demand for parking in a dense urban environment helps the city manage anticipated population growth and supports smart land use that minimize emissions.

Economic benefits

  • By increasing access to high-quality, safer cycling infrastructure, residents are able to save money that would otherwise be spent at the gas pumps. Reducing household transportation expenses is a tangible way to improve overall housing affordability.
  • New cycling infrastructure supports economic development for the tourism sector, but also provides an attractive environment to support the rapidly growing high-tech and entrepreneurial sectors.

Social benefit

  • The 32km network of bicycle routes is designed to be safer, more comfortable, and convenient for people of all ages and abilities. Infrastructure will connect major destinations including schools, parks, employment districts, shopping areas and regional trails.

Town of Baie Verte, NL
Regional community centre retrofit of Baie Verte High
Energy
MCIP grant: $750,000

The Town of Baie Verte is turning a former high school building into a regional community centre. Following a feasibility study, the community has a report detailing the building’s deficiencies and areas of improvement that can effectively address all outstanding issues and transform this currently defunct building into an energy-efficient and safe space for the residents of Baie Verte.

The regional community centre will include a new town hall, a new bowling alley, a repurposed gymnasium and a new library. The Town of Baie Verte will be the owner and operator of the centre, with core engineering and construction management performed through a partnership between AMEC Foster Wheeler and Mechanical Advantage.

Innovative benefit

  • Rather than tear down the existing structure, the town is retrofitting the building, bringing it up to higher environmental standards.

Environmental benefit

  • Renovations will replace the centralized oil furnace with a more efficient system, which will result in a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Economic benefit

  • The gymnasium and cafeteria spaces will be used for a variety of community functions including social events (i.e. weddings, celebrations, etc.), economic events (i.e. trade shows, conferences, training and team building events, etc.), or indoor sports and recreational activities, which will create a new revenue steam for the municipality.

Social benefits

  • The current town hall and town library spaces do not meet accessibility standards and their relocation to the centre will mean better access for all.
  • This space will also be designated as a base of operations for municipal emergency response, where residents may congregate and have access to food and water. This type of emergency gathering place is a growing need as our climate changes.

City of Dieppe, NB
Ruisseau Fox — Nouvelle Digue et Aboiteau
Climate change adaptation
MCIP grant: $750,000

The existing dike installed at the Fox Creek River watershed was designed with an embankment crest of 6.1 metres. Recent studies found that sea-level rise will pose a significant risk to the existing dike as the elevation of water is forecast to increase beyond its current height. If no actions are taken, overflow could occur more than 400 times per year in the future, causing flooding. 

For this project, the City of Dieppe will install a new dike, which will be designed with careful consideration of the risks associated with climate change — mainly, sea-level rise.

Innovative aspect

  • The city will undertake an archeological study to protect historical features such as the existing dike (called an “aboiteau”) which was installed in the early 19th century.

Environmental benefit

  • Construction of a new dike reduces the likelihood of flooding of gas stations, sewer systems and industrial sites, which can cause hazardous substance spills in the environment.

Economic benefit

  • Costs associated with repairing municipal infrastructure after flooding will be significantly reduced, if not eliminated.

Social benefit

  • The project will aim to reduce the vulnerability of the community to climate change impacts — including municipal assets and residential and commercial infrastructure within the watershed of Fox Creek River.

City of Moncton, NB
Centennial Park pool relocation
Climate change adaptation
MCIP grant: $750,000

The City of Moncton’s Centennial Park beach pool, built in 1984, is located at the lowest elevation in the park, near the banks of one of the city’s major streams. The pool and building have flooded several times since its construction and in 2017 the repairs were so significant that the city was unable to open the pool for the summer. The city has decided to relocate the pool to a location not affected by annual flooding.

The city completed two climate change adaptation plans and flood plain mapping and is confident that the new location eliminates the risk of flooding from Jonathan Creek. The new outdoor pool will have a footprint of 1,322 m2 and will be able to accommodate approximately 500 bathers.

Innovative aspect

  • The pool house will be a net zero building. This will be achieved by installing a series of solar photovoltaic panels on the roof to provide power for the building and for site lighting. Solar hot water panels will also be installed and will provide hot water for the pool house. This will allow the city to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions resulting from the operation of the facility.

Environmental benefit

  • Relocating the pool will have a positive environmental impact, given that when the current site floods, it increases erosion and the risk of polluting Jonathan Creek and the Petitcodiac River through runoff of sedimentation, chlorinated water and site debris into the waterways.

Economic benefit

  • Relocating the pool will eliminate the costs associated with repairs and lost revenues during closures following flooding.

Social benefits

  • With the new pool location in the park, the city will be able to offer this community service from June to September with no interruptions.
  • This project fits well with the Corporate Strategic Plan, taking a firm place within its pillars, including: “Social — to be a healthy and safe community that provides active living opportunities for all residents” and “Culture — to be a culturally vibrant community that promotes and celebrates the arts and pro-actively enriches the lives of all residents.”

Cape Breton Regional Municipality, NS
Cape Breton Regional Municipality wastewater sludge anaerobic digestion with combined heat and power
Waste
MCIP grant: $750,000

Cape Breton Regional Municipality (CBRM) is building a small anaerobic digester at the Battery Point Wastewater Treatment Plant to process the sludge and capture the resulting biogas to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by more than 60 per cent. At the present time, CBRM’s two wastewater treatment plants are producing 1,821 tonnes of sludge annually. The sludge is transferred to a local solid waste facility and then trucked many kilometres off Cape Breton Island where it is put in the landfill. GHG emissions are associated with landfilled organics and the diesel fuel used for transporting the sludge. Additionally, there are major odour complaints in the community.

Power generated by the new digester will offset both electricity costs and oil-fired heating costs at the facility. Given that biogas will be produced on-site and used for electricity and thermal production, there will be less risk associated with a disruption to fuel or electrical supply.

Innovative aspect

  • The new digester will capture biogas and use it in a combined heat and power system, to produce electrical and thermal energy.

Environmental benefits

  • The project will create a net reduction in GHG emissions of 2,564 tonnes per year. That is the equivalent of taking 549 cars off the road for a year and represents a 64 per cent reduction.
  • The project will also result in the diversion of 1,821 tonnes of material from the landfill.

Economic benefits

  • The project will result in a savings of more than $250,000 through reductions in tipping fees, transportation costs and energy costs.
  • The project will also help in assessing the viability of a utilizing a large digester system for green bin material, which would generate more energy and help CBRM achieve energy self-sufficiency.

Social benefits

  • One of the major social benefits of the project will be a reduction in the strong odour from the landfill.
  • This project provides an example of green innovation that can be replicated in other municipalities.

City of Thompson, MB
Active transportation
Transportation
MCIP grant: $640,000

The City of Thompson proposes to significantly extend its multi-use path project to residential, recreational, institutional and industrial areas of the community. By encouraging more active transportation throughout all but the winter months, it anticipates reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 25,000 kg of CO2 per year. The city is considering encouraging trail use during the winter months as well, as other “winter” cities such as Edmonton, AB, and Minneapolis, MN, have done. The project is divided into two phases. Phase 1 of the project will connect high-density residential area on Princeton Drive to the City’s Downtown, via Mystery Lake and Nelson Roads. Phase 2 will connect the existing path network with the industrial area of the City of Thompson, which has a high volume of traffic with no safe place to walk. Phase 2 will connect the Norplex Pool with more distant areas of the city. The objective of this initiative is to reduce the use of vehicles and make the community a healthy place for residents.

Innovative aspect

  • Extending multi-use pathways to encourage more active transportation and reduce vehicle traffic across the city.

Environmental benefit

  • The objective of this initiative is to reduce the use of vehicles, reducing their associated GHG emissions.

Economic benefit

  • The city has the capacity to design and manage the project.

Social benefit

  • Encouraging active transportation will make the community a healthy place for residents.

Municipality of Bayham, ON
Port Burwell climate change adaptation infrastructure
Climate change adaptation
MCIP grant: $778,400

The Municipality of Bayham proposes to install approximately 446 metres of storm sewer and approximately 100 metres of bioswale in the Village of Port Burwell. Stormwater management in the Village of Port Burwell requires upgrades to meet land use planning requirements for health and safety, and water quantity and quality, as set out in the Municipal Official Plan, the County of Elgin Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement. Although annual precipitation data has been consistent, the number of significant rain events over 20mm have continued to increase due to climate change, overwhelming the largely agricultural pipe-based system. The village has a population of over 1,000, with approximately 340 dwelling units in addition to commercial development. The current stormwater management system is not sufficient to provide the adequate and safe movement and treatment of stormwater prior to discharging into Lake Erie and Otter Creek. 

Environmental benefits

  • The stormwater management system will allow for increased water flow and improve the quality of water entering Lake Erie and Otter Creek.
  • By constructing a stormwater system that collects and treats stormwater before it enters into these bodies of water, the project will reduce the volume of water, contaminants and sediment, consistent with the province’s water strategy.

Social benefits

  • The safe movement and discharge of stormwater will reduce the risk and impact of flooding and potential damage to or loss of public and private property.
  • The management of stormwater will also reduce the health risks associated with stagnant ponding of water, which creates breeding areas for mosquitoes that may carry disease.

City of Kitchener, ON
RBJ Schlegel Park — green infrastructure initiative
Water
MCIP grant: $750,000

The City of Kitchener will be carrying out a capital project to incorporate innovative green infrastructure features for stormwater management of the new RBJ Schlegel Park. The green infrastructure will capture stormwater runoff on-site and will utilize a combination of rain gardens, rock trenches, infiltration galleries, and bioswales to treat the stormwater runoff. This approach is in keeping with the city’s recently adopted integrated Stormwater Management Master Plan (2016). These features will reduce the new park’s vulnerability to climate change by containing the entire Regional Storm on-site, minimizing the impacts to the downstream system. Through the RBJ Schlegel Park green infrastructure initiative, the city can continue to lead the way in the field of stormwater management, increase climate change resiliency, educate on climate change and demonstrate the benefits of green infrastructure to the community.

Innovative aspect

  • The stormwater design features include rain gardens in the parking areas, infiltration galleries under the artificial turf playing fields, bioswales and oil/grit separators to treat road runoff, and a rock trench infiltration gallery under a dry retention pond.

Environmental benefit

  • The stormwater runoff system will improve the watershed health, and runoff will be infiltrated, helping to protect the groundwater resources on which the region relies for drinking water.

Economic benefit

  • Monitoring the performance and maintenance requirements associated with green infrastructure will lead to a better understanding of how to fund these assets sustainably in the future.

Social benefit

  • The development of the park will include the design and construction of a multi-use sports and recreation complex that will feature sports fields, courts, amenities such as a playground and picnic areas, and an array of multi-use trails.

Town of Milton, ON
Transition of municipal ice resurfacer fleet to electric vehicles
Energy
MCIP grant: $308,900

The Town of Milton will replace natural gas ice resurfacers with electric ones. This will significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, providing a cleaner environment for these focal points of the community. It will also serve as a pilot for more widespread adoption of electric vehicles across the municipal fleet. Transitioning the town’s resurfacer fleet to electric vehicles promises to bring about considerable emissions reductions and benefit the community across the triple bottom line.

Innovative aspect

  • With electric replacement models funded by this project, the town will have more sustainable infrastructure and will be one step closer to making Milton one of the “greenest” communities in Canada.

Environmental benefit

  • An electric resurfacer eliminates nearly 90 per cent of the GHG emissions of its natural gas counterpart, reducing emissions by several tonnes per year at each facility.

Economic benefit

  • Electric resurfacers will have a lower fuel cost and a lifecycle that is nearly twice as long as a natural gas model.

Social benefit

  • Removal of emissions from enclosed community spaces that host a large cross-section of the population, including children and the elderly.

City of North Bay, ON
North Bay Community Energy Park
Climate change adaptation
MCIP grant: $750,000

North Bay Hydro Services is building Canada’s first community-based microgrid to supply energy to North Bay’s community assets: Memorial Gardens, the YMCA, the Aquatic Centre and Thomson Park. The Community Energy Park (CEP) project includes building audits, energy performance benchmarking, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions, building retrofits, a micro-grid controller, solar photovoltaic (PV) power, battery storage, combined heat and power (CHP) and an electric vehicle charging station. The CEP deploys new technology on a scale that paves the way for future microgrids.

Innovative aspect

  • Canada’s first community-based microgrid to supply energy to community assets.

Environmental benefit

  • The CEP and microgrid are physical insurance assets that will help the community and region deal with climate change and severe weather in the future, such as ice storms, extreme temperatures, wind events, floods and forest fires.

Economic benefit

  • With its own generation sources, the CEP would be capable of islanding from the main electrical grid, thereby lowering costs.

Social benefits

  • One of the key objectives of the CEP is to reduce the vulnerability of the community’s residents, infrastructure and power grid as a result of increased pressures from documented climate change. 
  • The CEP can be used to shelter individuals from municipalities and First Nations who may be evacuated due to fire, flood or other emergencies.

Region of Peel, ON
Region of Peel Mississauga Road — low-impact development stormwater project
Water adaptation
MCIP grant: $925,600

The Region of Peel, with support from Credit Valley Conservation (CVC), will be retrofitting the storm drainage system for Mississauga Road, a six-lane regional road, located between Queen Street and Williams Parkway, to include a bioswale infiltration and filtration system, a low-impact development (LID) practice.

Innovative aspect

  • This project will address water quantity and quality, reduce thermal impacts to receiving waters, reduce infrastructure life cycle costs, improve watershed health, maintain a high level of service and reduce water consumption.

Environmental benefit

  • The project has the potential to reduce the vulnerability of new or existing municipal assets to flooding and increased instream water temperature through its low-impact development approach.

Social benefit

  • The monitoring results from this project will be used to validate and calibrate the existing stormwater model and allow the project team to estimate scaled-up benefits of broader-scale implementation.

County of Simcoe, ON
Simcoe County Archives — energy-efficiency measures and rooftop solar
Energy
MCIP grant: $585,730

The County of Simcoe is retrofitting its archives building. The County’s archives process and store invaluable, sensitive documents and artifacts which represent the County’s history. As the risk of fire or explosion would compromise the archived materials, the building’s power, heating and cooling is not generated by natural gas or propane, but rather 100 per cent electricity, making the building’s baseline electricity demand considerably high. The retrofit combines energy-efficient measures with the installation of a rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) system in an effort to significantly reduce the facility’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. 

Innovative aspect

  • The combination of energy-efficient measures with the installation of a rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) system.

Environmental benefit

  • This project is expected to reduce the County’s dependence on grid electricity by over 21 per cent and, by reducing peak-day electricity demand when grid GHG emissions are highest, the project would reduce the County’s associated GHG emissions by 51 per cent.

Economic benefit

  • The project helps to offset the rising costs of grid electricity.

Social benefit

  • As the archives are adjacent to the Simcoe County Museum, which is visited frequently by the public and school programs, the project will create opportunities to educate the public about renewable energy.

City of Toronto, ON, and Evergreen
Evergreen Brick Works: Transitioning to a carbon-neutral campus
Energy
MCIP grant: $1,000,000

Evergreen Brick Works (EBW) is an iconic, publicly owned, industrial heritage property located in the heart of Toronto. It is run by Evergreen, an incorporated not-for-profit organization, as a demonstration hub where the world can experience sustainable practices that enable flourishing cities of the future. It is a test site for piloting and scaling projects, convening diverse stakeholders and showcasing ideas that will shape our cities for the better. Evergreen is transforming EBW into a carbon-neutral campus, starting with the retrofit of the 53,000 square foot Kiln Building.

Innovative aspect

  • The project involves a collaborative design approach, engaging a multi-disciplinary design team along with the City of Toronto and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, to develop principles and push the boundaries in low-carbon city building.

Environmental benefits

  • The new design elements will reduce overall GHG emissions from 688 CO2 tonnes per year, to 41 CO2 tonnes a year compared to a traditional boiler system, a reduction of approximately 94 per cent.
  • Significant dry and wet flood mitigation features have been incorporated, such as the new radiant raised floor system, natural approaches to stormwater management, new greenways planted with flood-resistant native species and a new combined geo-solar thermal heating and cooling system that will be one of the first of its kind in the country.

Social benefit

  • The Kiln Building will be the national home for Future Cities Canada, a new multi-sector collaborative that aims to accelerate innovation to build regenerative, inclusive low-carbon cities of the future.

City of Vaughan, ON
Rivermede Road / Bowes Road low-impact development retrofit pilot project
Water
MCIP grant: $299,900

The City of Vaughan will be carrying out a project to reduce the impacts of flooding at the Rivermede Road and Bowes Road intersection. The industrial subdivision located at this intersection area was built in the early 1960s with limited or no stormwater management controls. Flooding occurred at this intersection during storm events in 2011 and 2012 and it is likely that these short-duration and intense storms will be more common in the future as a result of climate change. The City of Vaughan is proposing an innovative project to reduce the total in-stream and overland flows during precipitation events in this area. The project will work with existing landowners in the predefined area to implement additional active rooftop rainwater storage on-site. Several properties will be chosen for installation based on cost-effectiveness of implementation, total budget of the project, and landowner interest in implementing rainwater re-use after installation.

Innovative aspects

  • The project will work with existing landowners in the predefined area to implement additional active rooftop rainwater storage on-site.
  • Each building in this system will be connected electronically to a larger network. The smart system will allow the city to monitor water levels and collect information about how much rainfall was collected during each event, when the valves were opened to release the stored stormwater, and whether the landowner / property manager chose to open the valves at any point in time.

Environmental benefits

  • The project will reduce the need for new materials to repair property damage, will improve water quality, and will reduce inflow and infiltration to the wastewater system.
  • Landowners have the opportunity to update rainwater re-use to increase resistance to drought and future water price increases, which would lead to a reduction in water demand.

Economic benefit

  • By reducing the frequency and severity of floods in the Rivermede/Bowes roads area, there will be financial benefits of reduced capital expenditures and insurance claims for property damage.

Social benefit

  • The City of Vaughan is striving to achieve triple bottom line benefits by increasing community resiliency through reduction in flood vulnerability of the area.

Regional Municipality of York, ON
Reducing GHG emissions by implementing anti-idling technologies for York Region paramedic fleet vehicles
Transportation
MCIP grant: $573,100

York Region Paramedic Services will be carrying out a project which involves the installation of anti-idle technology in the entire ambulance fleet and in Paramedic Response Unit SUVs. The aim is to reduce the amount of carbon emissions from its paramedic services fleet by 42.9 per cent. This system is designed to control and monitor engine idling, to maintain the interior temperature and battery charge, and to operate as a fully functional mobile platform for patient care, while saving fuel and reducing emissions and engine idle hours.

Paramedic services operate within a very tight set of parameters for service delivery. Vehicles must be reliable and carry medicines that need to be stored within a specific range of temperatures. To achieve these standards, paramedic vehicles in the field are either driving to a call or idling to maintain internal temperature and supply power to equipment. The standard ambulance configuration relies on the engine to provide propulsion, heat and power.

Innovative aspect

  • Anti-idle technology reduces the need to idle for heat and power.

Environmental benefits

  • The project aims to reduce the amount of carbon emissions from its paramedic services fleet by 42.9 per cent.
  • The immediate reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from these technologies is significant and the future potential across the industry is enormous.

Economic benefit

  • Reduction in engine idling can reduce the financial cost of maintaining the fleet.

Social benefits

  • This project will have a positive social benefit for York Region citizens as it will lead to significant reductions in GHG emissions, and will therefore improve air quality and ultimately overall health.
  • The vehicles will provide ample opportunities for the region to showcase the technology in the form of public education.

City of Prince Albert, SK
Public transit extended service hours trial
Transportation
MCIP grant: $87,200

The City of Prince Albert was studying the extension of its public transportation services beyond current hours of operation on weekday evenings, and on Saturdays. The completed project consisted of a four-month trial. If successful, the increased hours of operation will reduce traffic congestion, and could stretch peak demand periods for public transit, making it easier to manage the fleet of vehicles and the service itself. 

Innovative aspect

  • It is anticipated that improving public transit will encourage modal shift and reduce the use of personal automobiles

Environmental benefit

  • A reduction of 27 per cent in GHG emissions is expected for the scope of this project

Economic benefits

  • Longer service hours could translate into increased ridership
  • Increased ridership will help reduce the usage costs of personal vehicles

Social benefits

  • Providing access to transportation for those who otherwise have no other option
  • Providing access to employment, healthcare, shopping, etc., where there currently is no access

Town of Shellbrook, SK
Improving the energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions of the Affinity Credit Union Recreation Centre
Energy
MCIP grant: $750,000

The Town of Shellbrook will install energy reduction measures in the Affinity Credit Union Recreation Centre to achieve or exceed a 50 per cent reduction target in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The centre is a hub of regional sport and activity for the town and surrounding villages, hamlets, rural municipalities and First Nations communities. Potential upgrades will improve the functionality and comfort of the facility during the winter months, and a new insulated surface will extend the enjoyment of the arena to the summer months by supporting activities like lacrosse as well as large functions and trade shows. The Town of Shellbrook has conducted a detailed energy and building condition assessment, including life cycle cost analysis to identify sustainable options to retrofit the existing Affinity Credit Union Recreation Centre. The proposed option includes the installation of a new ice plant and a refrigeration heat recovery system, improvement to the building envelope, a new control system, a new LED lighting system and a new 100 kW PV system.

Innovative aspect

  • The clean energy retrofits, including the installation of a new ice plant, refrigeration heat recovery system, improvement to the building envelope, new control system, new LED lighting system and new 100 kW PV system will extend the use and sustainability of the centre for years to come.

Environmental benefit

  • Energy reduction measures to the Affinity Credit Union Recreation Center are aimed at achieving or exceeding a 50 per cent reduction target in GHG emissions.

Economic benefits

  • Insulation and upgrades to key components of the building will amount to savings in the cost of heating and maintenance in the long term.
  • Upgrades will extend the use of the centre, enabling it to host large functions and trade shows in the summer months, which can offer economic benefits to local businesses.

Social benefits

  • Upgrades to the recreation centre would improve the functionality and comfort of the facility for the 10,000 inhabitants who rely on the arena and curling rink during the winter months.
  • A new insulated surface will extend enjoyment of the arena to the summer months to support activities like lacrosse, large functions and trade shows.
Infrastructure
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