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Election 2019: Let’s empower local governments
to build better lives for Canadians

Federal Election 2019 is a pivotal opportunity to modernize how governments work together to serve Canadians. Local leaders are the closest to people’s daily challenges. They are building better lives, and with modernized tools and a seat at the nation-building table, they’ll be ready to do so much more.

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Featured news and resources

FCM’s programs and advocacy help secure new tools that empower municipalities to build stronger communities of all sizes. Explore below to find out what’s new with us.

Cannabis Excise Tax Submission

Cannabis Excise Tax Submission

Cannabis Excise Tax Submission

Published: 2018 - PDF (0.75 MB)

Our cities and communities are where non-medical cannabis will be produced, sold and consumed—and the proposed legislation places municipalities on the front lines of keeping Canadians safe and well served.

FCM recognizes the Budget 2017 commitment of $81 million over 5 years that is being made available to provinces and territories to support police training and other capacity building related to enforcement. This type of program could be scaled up to better reflect policing costs, start-up and ongoing, particularly where excise tax revenue is lower than anticipated.

Case study: Quebec community serves as a model zero-waste example

Project type Grant amount Community
Pilot project $32,700 Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie, Montréal, QC

Montreal Zero Waste Challenge participants
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Roxanne Comtois, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre, Laure Caillot, specialist, Défi zéro déchet, and Claudette Therrien, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre.

Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie is a densely populated central part of Montréal with nearly 140,000 residents. In 2016, 63 per cent of its household garbage ended up in a landfill, so the borough developed the Défi zéro déchet (Zero Waste Challenge) to reduce that number.

The program was inspired by the concept of zero waste, a movement that is gaining momentum in Quebec and other cities around the world, which focuses on five principles: 

  • Refuse
  • Reduce
  • Reuse
  • Recycle 
  • Compost

This pilot project should: 

  • Reduce household waste by 30 to 50 per cent (i.e., reduce the waste per person, per year by 109 to 181 kg)
  • Reduce 16,390 tonnes in household waste per year at the district level, in the long term

People on a stage talking at the Zero Waste Challenge panel
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Gabrielle Lamontagne-Hallé, Amélie Côté, Laure Caillot, Bchira Dhouib, Douglas Besson

Out of 569 applications, 50 households participated in the pilot between October 2018 and June 2019, and each one weighed its waste throughout the project. The organizers also recruited three professional zero-waste specialists, who worked closely with each household.

“Midway through the project, the volunteers had reduced their waste by 20 per cent on average—a remarkable outcome four months into the challenge,” states Marilou Deschênes, a Sustainable Development Research Officer of the borough.

“The Zero Waste Challenge, as small as it may seem, has enormous potential to turn Montréal into a sustainable city. The fact that the project was so popular shows that municipalities have a role to play in helping residents transition to a low-impact lifestyle.”

—Marilou Deschênes, Sustainable Development Research Officer, Communications Division, Borough of Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie

Participants were offered support activities based on their needs, including telephone support, individual and group meetings, special thematic workshops and a private Facebook group. The public could access information about the participants on a website, along with their testimonies, goals and achievements.

The borough estimates that in its first edition, Défi zéro déchet will reduce the total household waste generated by 10 to 17 tonnes.

Overall, the goal of the challenge is to position borough citizens as leaders in reducing waste before it goes to landfills. The pilot aims to test an innovative solution that is replicable and inspires other communities. 

“During the challenge, I was able to enjoy workshops and the feeling that I was part of a community, with all the support that entails. …  My responsible consumption is my own contribution to the fight against climate change.”

Jean Gagnon Doré, Défi zéro déchet participant

Additional resources 

FCM applauds Supreme Court decision on Windsor v. Canadian Transit Company

This morning, in a dispute between the City of Windsor and the Canadian Transit Company, the federally regulated corporation that operates the international bridge crossing between Windsor and Detroit (Corporation of the City of Windsor v. Canadian Transit Company), the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that issues relating to the application of municipal bylaws to federal undertakings should be decided by the Superior Courts of each province, not by the Federal Court of Canada.

FCM intervened in this case at Windsor's request and is pleased by this outcome. As stated by the Court, resolving federal-municipal jurisdictional questions in Superior Courts is not only in keeping with the Constitution, but it guarantees greater access to justice for municipalities and community groups across the country by ensuring that such cases are heard locally.

This case relates to CTC's attempt to have the Federal Court of Canada decide whether Windsor's property standards bylaw applied to its 114 derelict properties. Windsor was of the view that this matter should be decided locally by the Ontario Superior Court, as has been the case for all federal-municipal jurisdictional disputes since Confederation. The matter can now proceed to Superior Court in Windsor to determine the real issue at play: whether the property standards bylaw applies to the CTC's properties and whether the CTC has violated these bylaws.

FCM supported the argument that the Federal Court does not have jurisdiction over issues of this type and that these must be decided in the local courthouse by a Superior Court Justice. FCM will continue to defend the constitutional rights of local governments to enact and enforce bylaws that protect the interest of their residents by making legal interventions on issues of broad national interest to Canada's municipalities.

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Case study: Manitoba town leads innovation in northern communities

Project type Amount Community
Capital project

Loan: $4,368,300
Grant: $655,200

Neepawa, MB

Sign for the Town of Neepawa

In 2016, the growing Town of Neepawa had pushed its lagoon system to the brink. The community decided to upgrade its wastewater system while taking future growth and sustainable development into consideration. 

The town’s conventional lagoon system can accommodate sewage waste from 4,500 residents. The Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) technology, upon which the town’s new design is based, can serve a population of 7,500. This approach, not usually used in cold weather climates, will inform initiatives in other northern communities facing similar challenges. The technology is compact, can be easily replicated and maintained and works well where land is at a premium or limited. 

“The incorporation of the new technology will modernize the way effluent is treated. The entire community will benefit from this project, not only in relation to efficient wastewater treatment, but by repurposing the two lagoon cells into a licensed compost and an area for water retention.”

Colleen Synchyshyn, Chief Administrative Officer, Town of Neepawa 

The upgraded process will allow the town to meet nutrient removal limits and extend the lagoon system’s lifespan so it can easily accommodate future growth and the community’s needs. Another key advantage of this new system is that its design is self-adapting to seasonal changes and will be able to accommodate extremely low temperatures in winter. Furthermore, the organic treatment process could divert approximately 30 per cent of the waste currently going to a landfill. 

“The wastewater processing has not always been adequate, and MBBR is entirely new technology that will lead to better results. I think the biggest highlight for me is that this project will increase the capacity for our community. It will allow industrial, commercial and residential growth.”

Ken Waddell, Publisher: Neepawa Banner & Press, Rivers Banner (see: myWestman.ca)

Neepawa’s MBBR project will provide efficient and effective wastewater treatment and will result in continuous discharge into the water system. This differs from conventional storage which, at given times of the year, can emit an offensive odor. The MBBR will also help address the significantly increased load that’s been put on the system in the last decade, via the expansion of a local processing plant. That expansions will also increase the community’s labour opportunities. 

We expect this project to: 

  • Reduce total suspended solids (TSS) by 85 percent
  • Increase treatment capacity from 611,000 m3/year to 1,007,400 m3/year (65 percent increase)
  • Reduce energy consumption by 2,690 GJ/year

Additional resources 

Case study: Manitoba town leads innovation in northern communities

Project type Amount Community
Capital project

Loan: $4,368,300
Grant: $655,200

Neepawa, MB

Sign for the Town of Neepawa

In 2016, the growing Town of Neepawa had pushed its lagoon system to the brink. The community decided to upgrade its wastewater system while taking future growth and sustainable development into consideration. 

The town’s conventional lagoon system can accommodate sewage waste from 4,500 residents. The Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) technology, upon which the town’s new design is based, can serve a population of 7,500. This approach, not usually used in cold weather climates, will inform initiatives in other northern communities facing similar challenges. The technology is compact, can be easily replicated and maintained and works well where land is at a premium or limited. 

“The incorporation of the new technology will modernize the way effluent is treated. The entire community will benefit from this project, not only in relation to efficient wastewater treatment, but by repurposing the two lagoon cells into a licensed compost and an area for water retention.”

Colleen Synchyshyn, Chief Administrative Officer, Town of Neepawa 

The upgraded process will allow the town to meet nutrient removal limits and extend the lagoon system’s lifespan so it can easily accommodate future growth and the community’s needs. Another key advantage of this new system is that its design is self-adapting to seasonal changes and will be able to accommodate extremely low temperatures in winter. Furthermore, the organic treatment process could divert approximately 30 per cent of the waste currently going to a landfill. 

“The wastewater processing has not always been adequate, and MBBR is entirely new technology that will lead to better results. I think the biggest highlight for me is that this project will increase the capacity for our community. It will allow industrial, commercial and residential growth.”

Ken Waddell, Publisher: Neepawa Banner & Press, Rivers Banner (see: myWestman.ca)

Neepawa’s MBBR project will provide efficient and effective wastewater treatment and will result in continuous discharge into the water system. This differs from conventional storage which, at given times of the year, can emit an offensive odor. The MBBR will also help address the significantly increased load that’s been put on the system in the last decade, via the expansion of a local processing plant. That expansions will also increase the community’s labour opportunities. 

We expect this project to: 

  • Reduce total suspended solids (TSS) by 85 percent
  • Increase treatment capacity from 611,000 m3/year to 1,007,400 m3/year (65 percent increase)
  • Reduce energy consumption by 2,690 GJ/year

Additional resources 

Roll of Honour

FCM honours the true difference-makers of local government with our Roll of Honour Awards. These awards pays tribute to FCM officers, and to officials of member municipalities and municipal associations who have made an outstanding contribution to FCM and to municipal government in Canada. You can read more about eligibility criteria here.

Current recipients

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen was elected councillor in the City of Saint-Laurent, Quebec, in 1982, and continued to serve there for 35 years. Through his nine terms in office, his commitment to community service strengthened a range of committees and boards, including economic development, urban planning and intercultural relations.

From Montreal’s first-ever French-language Jewish public school, which he helped found, to Saint-Laurent’s well-loved sports complex, which he championed, Mr. Cohen has left a lasting mark on his community. Nationally, he leaves no less of a mark on FCM, where he served on the Board of Directors for a remarkable 17 years and was known for his enthusiasm and ability to bring people together.

 

Pauline Quinlan

In 1998, Pauline Quinlan became the first woman ever elected mayor of Bromont, Quebec.

Through five consecutive mandates, she earned a reputation for tackling tough economic challenges—for a community that doubled in population under her leadership. Her countless contributions include spearheading the Bromont Economic Development Corporation, increasing the profile of Bromont Science Park, and implementing a 20-year sustainable development plan.

Ms. Quinlan brought that same record of results to FCM’s Board of Directors where she served from 2003 to 2017. Recently, as co-chair of FCM’s National Municipal Rail Safety Working Group, her leadership helped shape critical improvements across the country—and earned her the position of co-chair of the national Railway Safety Act Review Panel.

 

oger Anderson

Roger Anderson

First elected councillor in the Town of Ajax, Ontario, in 1985, Roger Anderson went on to serve as Ajax Deputy Mayor in 1991 before taking up the role of Durham Regional Chair in 1997. He went on become Durham’s longest serving regional chair until his passing in 2018.

Mr. Anderson dedicated his life to public service, serving as a police constable before becoming a public official. His dedication to local government—and its capacity to build better lives—made him an important figure at FCM, where he was a long-time Board member and instrumental in building several programs. He was especially proud of his formative role in our Ukraine program and the difference it has made for people on the ground.

 

Past recipients

2018

  • Pam McConnell — former Councillor, Toronto, ON

2017

  • Hazel McCallion — former Mayor, Mississauga, ON
  • Brad Woodside — former Mayor, Fredericton, NB; former FCM President
  • Russ Powers — former Councillor, Dundas, ON, and Hamilton, ON; former President, Association of Municipalities of Ontario; former FCM Director
  • Debra Button — former Councillor and Mayor, Weyburn, SK; former President, Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association; former FCM director
  • Joanne Monaghan — former Councillor and Mayor, Kitimat, BC; former President, Union of BC Municipalities; former FCM President

2016

  • Lise Burcher — former Councillor, Guelph, ON; former FCM Director
  • Don Forfar — former Mayor, St. Andrews, MB; former FCM Director

2015

  • Karen Leibovici — former FCM President, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Doug Reycraft — former FCM Board member, former AMO President
  • Basil Stewart — former FCM President, former Mayor of Summerside

2014

  • Colette Roy-Laroche — former Mayor of Lac-Mégantic
  • Graham Letto — former Mayor and former Councillor, Labrador City

2013

  • Yvette Hayden (Gonzalez) — former Northwest Territories Association of Communities CEO
  • Gordon Van Tighem — former FCM Director, former Mayor of Yellowknife, former Northwest Territories Association of Communities President
  • Big Cities Mayors' Caucus — David Miller, former Mayor of Toronto, Dave Bronconnier, former Mayor of Calgary, Senator Larry Campbell, former Mayor of Vancouver, Ann-Marie DeCicco-Best, former Mayor of London, Pat Fiacco, former Mayor of Regina and former FCM Big City Mayors' Caucus Chair

2012

  • Jim Green — former FCM Director, former Vancouver Councillor
  • Gord Steeves — former FCM President, former Winnipeg Councillor
  • Michael Phair — former FCM Director, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Mel Kositsky — former FCM Director, former Langley Councillor
  • Michael Power— former FCM Director, former AMO President, Geraldton
  • James W. Knight — former FCM Chief Executive Officer

Case study: Nova Scotia's longest paved bike path in Cape Breton

Project type Amount Community
Capital project

Loan: $1 million
Grant: $100,000

Sydney and Glace Bay, NS

 

Cape breton bike path

 

Bike paths are an anomaly in Nova Scotia, and this project was the largest component of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality's (CBRM) Active Transportation (AT) plan. In 2007–2008, it carried out public consultations, including focus groups, five public open houses and an online survey. An advisory committee met regularly after the study to monitor the project's progress. Its representatives included:

  • The municipality
  • The Nova Scotia Department of Transportation
  • Velo Cape Breton
  • The Regional Health Authority
  • Mayflower Mall 
  • Cape Breton University
  • Heart and Stroke Foundation

The path is expected to:

  • Remove 1,240 vehicles from the road
  • Reduce vehicle kilometres travelled by 7,936,000 per year
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1.5 million kg of CO2e per year
  • Stimulate economic growth by increasing interaction between Sydney and Glace Bay, as well as the university
  • Serve approximately 4,000 students and 450 staff at the university
  • Serve approximately 1,400 students and 170 staff at the Nova Scotia Community College (Marconi Campus)

Cape breton bike path

Many of their design suggestions were incorporated into the final plan

The 10-kilometre multi-use path links Sydney, Glace Bay and Cape Breton University. It's an off-road, AT corridor, where people can walk, bike, inline skate or skateboard with minimal vehicular interactions. It's a safe alternative transportation route in a corridor that was previously served only by the Grand Lake Road–a four-lane highway. The pathway is wheelchair accessible.

"I think this project truly showed that we can make huge improvements in our communities if we apply ourselves and commit to the implementation of our AT plan. My hope is that people will realize the potential we have in regards to converting existing rail beds and trails into functioning AT corridors."

– Malcolm Roach, Operations Supervisor, Public Works East, New Waterford and Area, Cape Breton Regional Municipality

This new route will enhance Mayflower Mall's economic viability by connecting it to nearby residential areas. It's the region's largest shopping centre. The 570 students living on campus can now access shopping and employment opportunities by bicycle, reducing their personal travel costs. Other students and university employees from Sydney and Glace Bay can now bike to campus.

"The feedback from our membership has been overwhelmingly positive... Though designed as a transportation corridor, it is proving to be recreational, especially for new cyclists and families with young cyclists."

– Andree Crepeau, Vice-President, Velo Cape Breton

Additional resources 

Case study: Improving health and comfort for residents in the GTA

Project type Amount Community

Capital project

Grant: $750,000 
Loan: $5 million 

Toronto and Hamilton, ON

The Atmospheric Fund (TAF) event
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Julia Langer, CEO, TAF at the podium; Kevin Marshman, CEO,
Toronto Community Housing Corporation; Marco Mendicino, MP and Parliamentary Secretary
to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; Toronto-Danforth MP Julia Dabrusin;
Toronto Mayor John Tory; Kitchener Mayor Berry Vrbanovic

Nearly 44 per cent of people in urban areas live in apartments and condos, as stated in a report by the The Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF). If retrofitted to become more energy-efficient, these types of buildings could support national efforts to reduce GHG emissions. A key barrier is the lack of information available to support the technical and economic feasibility of these types of projects. The Accelerating Deep Energy Retrofits (ADER) project is changing that. 

TAF, in partnership with the City of Toronto, is working to implement retrofits to four multi-residential buildings in the downtown Toronto area and in the City of Hamilton. The buildings, totaling 791 households, represent a range of ownership structures and residents, from young families to seniors, and include:

  • Rental apartments
  • A condominium 
  • Two low-income social housing buildings

The City of Hamilton will help develop lessons learned and best practices for future scale-up efforts, and will add a multi-unit residential complex to the initiative. 

“We’re excited about this project’s ability to accelerate the adoption of retrofits around the country. My favourite thing about it is the opportunity to improve health and comfort for building residents, even as we reduce energy costs and carbon emissions. For example, heat pump technology not only dramatically reduces heating energy use, it also provides highly efficient air conditioning.”  

—Bryan Purcell, Vice-President, Policy and Programs, The Toronto Atmospheric Fund 

The average number of days above 30˚C in the Toronto area has increased by more than 50 per cent. This means residents of older, multi-family buildings are increasingly exposed to unhealthy temperature extremes. This project aims to dramatically reduce this type of exposure. TAF has already installed air-source heat pumps at two sites in the past year and has undertaken design work on the remaining buildings. These deep energy retrofits can reduce operating costs, improve indoor environmental quality and resident comfort and create local jobs. 

“This is the best thing that has been done for [our] housing. It lowers [our] energy bills, provides heating and cooling. It's a lot colder in the summer and a lot warmer in the winter. You have more freedom and control,” says Diane Laidley, a resident at one of the Toronto ADER sites. 

As a way to see firsthand how residents can benefit from the heating and cooling retrofits, TAF will also undertake a comprehensive monitoring and verification process to help ensure that the expected energy savings continue to materialize throughout the newly installed systems’ lifecycles. 

The participants will widely share the knowledge gained from these projects through case studies, white papers and presentations. 

This project will:

  • Reduce GHG emissions by 546 tonnes C02e/year 
  • Reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions in the four buildings by at least 40 percent
  • Reduce water consumption with the installation of new low-flow fixtures and ultra-low-flow toilets 

Additional resources 

Case study: BC community centre supports families and children

Project type Grant amount Community
Feasibility study $21,300 City of Maple Ridge, BC

Albion community centre and school


When the City of Maple Ridge saw a need for improved and sustainable recreational services, it birthed the idea of a community centre in the Albion area. Around the same time, the school district was preparing to start public consultations for a new 500+ student elementary school. And so, a joint planning and consultation process began. It emphasized shared space, a connection to nature and a green building design with an educational component. 

The city completed a GMF-funded study to determine the technical and financial feasibility of implementing energy efficiency guidelines for the centre. This study was a result of an extensive community-wide consultation, including:

  • An open house 
  • Neighbourhood workshops with students
  • Interviews with major stakeholders, including the Katzie and Kwantlen First Nations, School District, Metro Vancouver Regional District and facility operators 
  • A series of community-wide surveys 
  • 25 community partner outreach meetings 
  • Information sharing through local media, the city and school district’s websites and social media platforms

This feasibility study allowed the community to develop:

  • A review of net-energy reduction in a building that is atypical and doesn’t meet various sustainable program standards 
  • Energy modeling that determined how changes in architectural, mechanical and electrical systems would impact the building’s cost and performance 
  • An exploration and understanding of sustainability paths that allowed the city council to make better funding decisions

Albion community centre

The city investigated four highly reputable programs currently in place to advance green building in British Columbia. Given the limitations of this location (i.e., it is remote and certain codes don’t apply to institutional buildings), it became clear that a LEED Silver certification was likely the highest level the building could achieve. The results suggested that the new design would use 62 per cent less energy than a baseline building designed to minimum code standards. 


“To me, the best part about this project is the interface between the elementary school and the green building education. This centre is also an example of the great partnership between the school and the city, and is one of our many mutual projects. In the long run, it will save taxpayer dollars and provide better services to the community.”

–Don Cramb, Senior Recreation Manager, Maple Ridge Parks, Recreation & Culture 

The community voiced its strong support for the concept of a co-located elementary school and neighbourhood community centre. The designers focused on incorporating the existing landscape into the design and showcased some sustainable approaches as part of its educational approach. The centre will also serve as a major node to natural trail connections in the surrounding riparian area. 


“I think the centre will enhance our community greatly… There is an overall need in the area to support children and families, so it is really wonderful to see these synergies.” 

–Rick Delorme, Director of Maintenance and Facilities, School District 42 Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows

Additional resources 

Case study: Quebec community serves as a model zero-waste example

Project type Grant amount Community
Pilot project $32,700 Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie, Montréal, QC

Montreal Zero Waste Challenge participants
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Roxanne Comtois, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre, Laure Caillot, specialist, Défi zéro déchet, and Claudette Therrien, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre.

Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie is a densely populated central part of Montréal with nearly 140,000 residents. In 2016, 63 per cent of its household garbage ended up in a landfill, so the borough developed the Défi zéro déchet (Zero Waste Challenge) to reduce that number.

The program was inspired by the concept of zero waste, a movement that is gaining momentum in Quebec and other cities around the world, which focuses on five principles: 

  • Refuse
  • Reduce
  • Reuse
  • Recycle 
  • Compost

This pilot project should: 

  • Reduce household waste by 30 to 50 per cent (i.e., reduce the waste per person, per year by 109 to 181 kg)
  • Reduce 16,390 tonnes in household waste per year at the district level, in the long term

People on a stage talking at the Zero Waste Challenge panel
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Gabrielle Lamontagne-Hallé, Amélie Côté, Laure Caillot, Bchira Dhouib, Douglas Besson

Out of 569 applications, 50 households participated in the pilot between October 2018 and June 2019, and each one weighed its waste throughout the project. The organizers also recruited three professional zero-waste specialists, who worked closely with each household.

“Midway through the project, the volunteers had reduced their waste by 20 per cent on average—a remarkable outcome four months into the challenge,” states Marilou Deschênes, a Sustainable Development Research Officer of the borough.

“The Zero Waste Challenge, as small as it may seem, has enormous potential to turn Montréal into a sustainable city. The fact that the project was so popular shows that municipalities have a role to play in helping residents transition to a low-impact lifestyle.”

—Marilou Deschênes, Sustainable Development Research Officer, Communications Division, Borough of Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie

Participants were offered support activities based on their needs, including telephone support, individual and group meetings, special thematic workshops and a private Facebook group. The public could access information about the participants on a website, along with their testimonies, goals and achievements.

The borough estimates that in its first edition, Défi zéro déchet will reduce the total household waste generated by 10 to 17 tonnes.

Overall, the goal of the challenge is to position borough citizens as leaders in reducing waste before it goes to landfills. The pilot aims to test an innovative solution that is replicable and inspires other communities. 

“During the challenge, I was able to enjoy workshops and the feeling that I was part of a community, with all the support that entails. …  My responsible consumption is my own contribution to the fight against climate change.”

Jean Gagnon Doré, Défi zéro déchet participant

Additional resources 

What we do
Explore these key areas to find out how we’re helping to build stronger communities—and a better Canada.
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Resources

This library contains reports, toolkits, recommendations and other resources that are designed to help you address challenges in your community.

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Funding

We’ve got you covered with the right type of funding, from plans and studies, to pilots, capital projects and more.

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Focus areas

Learn how we’re working with local governments of all sizes to tackle national and global challenges.

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Programs

Increasing sustainability and enhancing the quality of life for people across Canada and around the world.

Canadian municipalities benefit with FCM

FCM works on behalf of 2,000+ member municipalities to shape the national agenda, and delivers tools that empower local governments. Together, we are building stronger communities—and a better Canada.

2019 Federation of Canadian Municipalities