Let`s build a better Canada. One town at a time. Building better lives.

Election 2019: Let’s empower local governments
to build better lives for Canadians

Federal Election 2019 is a pivotal opportunity to modernize how governments work together to serve Canadians. Local leaders are the closest to people’s daily challenges. They are building better lives, and with modernized tools and a seat at the nation-building table, they’ll be ready to do so much more.

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Featured news and resources

FCM’s programs and advocacy help secure new tools that empower municipalities to build stronger communities of all sizes. Explore below to find out what’s new with us.

Diverse Voices: Tools and Practices to Support all Women

Diverse Voices: Tools and Practices to Support all WomenWomen are consistently underrepresented in leadership positions across the political and professional spheres, filling only 26 per cent of the seats in the House of Commons, Provincial and Municipal governments.

Diverse Voices: Tools and Practices to Support all Women explores how municipalities across Canada can work to reduce, and eventually eliminate, the leadership gap. Using examples from select municipalities, it provides resources and tools for local action to support women as leaders and agents of change.

Download the toolkit

FCM welcomes Canadian poverty reduction strategy

 "Tackling poverty in Canada requires coordination among all levels of government, starting with municipalities. Today's release of a federal poverty reduction strategy is a meaningful response to FCM recommendations, and is a positive step toward tackling the poverty that affects Canadians in every city and town across the country. 

"Every single day, municipal leaders see how poverty prevents people and communities from achieving their full potential. From their place on the front lines, local governments are also making the most of the tools available to respond. They are bringing diverse actors together to tailor federal and provincial initiatives to local realities, and many are leading the way with comprehensive local poverty reduction plans of their own.

"Opportunity for All aligns with FCM's recommendations to boost access to the things people need to thrive - from affordable housing, childcare and transit to robust income supports. Our top priority is an effective roll-out of the National Housing Strategy engaging all orders of government. As well, strengthening data collection and reducing data gaps, if this engages local governments and service providers, will enable municipalities to design, scale up and track local solutions with sharper evidenced-driven policies and programs.

"The experience of living in poverty varies across the country, and so do the right solutions. While Canadians see and feel poverty's effects most at the local level, other orders of government manage investment and policy levers that are vital to lasting solutions. So we especially welcome today's fresh recognition that tackling poverty requires coordinated action across orders of government, grounded in municipal expertise.

"FCM was pleased to participate in this process through our CEO, Brock Carlton, who served on the Ministerial Advisory Committee that informed Opportunity for All. To succeed, any national poverty reduction strategy will need to continue engaging the local order of government every step of the way. FCM and our municipal members look forward to working in partnership to build a Canada where everyone has the opportunity to thrive."

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is the national voice of municipal governments, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of the Canadian population.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Homelessness
Housing
Inclusive communities
Poverty reduction

Coast-to-coast cooperation to build tomorrow's Canada

"Following this week's announcement in Saskatchewan, Canada now has bilateral infrastructure agreements in place in every province and territory—a milestone achievement. These agreements set the stage for a decade of transformational progress driven by local governments: better roads and transit, modern wastewater systems, more resilient and sustainable infrastructure, and more.

"For more than two years, FCM has helped shape the long-term federal plan to invest in Canada's transit, social, green and rural infrastructure. As a result, we have set in motion a historic opportunity to strengthen the cities and communities that Canadians call home. And this opportunity was always going to rely on strong agreements with provinces and territories.

"These bilateral agreements make major commitments that recognize local governments' central role in nation-building. Raising the bar on cost-sharing—to at least 40 per cent federal and 33 per cent provincial—empowers municipalities to move projects forward. And with strong follow-through, committing to fund a fair 'balance' of municipal and provincial priorities breaks new ground in this relationship.

"For rural, northern and remote communities, even stronger cost-sharing and streamlined project administration means more projects can go ahead. At the same time, predictable, allocation-based public transit funding puts Canadian cities in the driver's seat, as they plan and deliver the next decade of ambitious transit expansions.

"Municipalities deliver local solutions to national challenges, from economic productivity to public safety to climate change. With infrastructure agreements in place, the next step is provincial and territorial intake processes that work locally. Provincial-territorial municipal associations across the country are ready to help get this right and get projects moving. This is about orders of government working together to build tomorrow's Canada-livable, competitive and sustainable."

Vicki-May Hamm is President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) and Mayor of the City of Magog, QC. FCM is the national voice of local government, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of Canada's population.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Infrastructure

Coast-to-coast cooperation to build tomorrow's Canada

"Following this week's announcement in Saskatchewan, Canada now has bilateral infrastructure agreements in place in every province and territory—a milestone achievement. These agreements set the stage for a decade of transformational progress driven by local governments: better roads and transit, modern wastewater systems, more resilient and sustainable infrastructure, and more.

"For more than two years, FCM has helped shape the long-term federal plan to invest in Canada's transit, social, green and rural infrastructure. As a result, we have set in motion a historic opportunity to strengthen the cities and communities that Canadians call home. And this opportunity was always going to rely on strong agreements with provinces and territories.

"These bilateral agreements make major commitments that recognize local governments' central role in nation-building. Raising the bar on cost-sharing—to at least 40 per cent federal and 33 per cent provincial—empowers municipalities to move projects forward. And with strong follow-through, committing to fund a fair 'balance' of municipal and provincial priorities breaks new ground in this relationship.

"For rural, northern and remote communities, even stronger cost-sharing and streamlined project administration means more projects can go ahead. At the same time, predictable, allocation-based public transit funding puts Canadian cities in the driver's seat, as they plan and deliver the next decade of ambitious transit expansions.

"Municipalities deliver local solutions to national challenges, from economic productivity to public safety to climate change. With infrastructure agreements in place, the next step is provincial and territorial intake processes that work locally. Provincial-territorial municipal associations across the country are ready to help get this right and get projects moving. This is about orders of government working together to build tomorrow's Canada-livable, competitive and sustainable."

Vicki-May Hamm is President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) and Mayor of the City of Magog, QC. FCM is the national voice of local government, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of Canada's population.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Infrastructure

Webinar recording: Opportunities and best practices in climate change action

Are you an elected official looking for a clear understanding of why your municipality should focus on climate change? Are you wondering how and where to start? 

This introductory webinar explores how Canada's climate is changing and the challenges and opportunities this creates for municipalities. Learn ways you can champion climate change action in your community and how you can gain support for climate related initiatives from internal and external stakeholders. 

Discover how Leduc, AB is adapting to climate change impacts and how they gained support to develop their Weather and Climate Readiness Action Plan. Hear about the steps Oxford County, ON took to gain support from their council for a resolution that would move them to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

This webinar is intended for elected officials from Canadian communities of all sizes.

What you will learn:

  • Understand the challenges that climate change represents for municipalities
  • Recognize the benefits of taking action on climate change in your municipality
  • Learn ways to get support for climate related initiatives from internal and external stakeholders

Speakers:

  • Bob Young, Mayor, Leduc, AB
  • Trevor Birtch, Mayor, Woodstock, ON

Read the transcript

 

Webinar recording: How to build partnerships to help revitalize your brownfields

Learn from the City of Nanaimo's experience in reviving its downtown and waterfront

Downtown waterfronts are at the heart of many Canadian communities. For many, waterfronts were once bustling engines of a past industrial economy; some now sit vacant — void of the productivity that once supported their communities. Often derelict and sometimes contaminated, these brownfield sites create barriers between citizens and their waterfronts — and there are often challenges for redeveloping these sites. 

Watch this webinar to find out how municipalities can work through partnerships to move beyond these barriers. Speakers will describe how partnerships have been central to efforts in the City of Nanaimo, BC, in reconnecting its shoreline and downtown communities. Since 2000, the city has collaborated with local businesses, property owners, the Snuneymuxw First Nation, the Government of Canada and the Province of BC. FCM's Green Municipal Fund has supported Nanaimo's brownfield redevelopment strategy to help guide this progress.

You'll learn:

  • How visioning and planning has set Nanaimo's course toward implementing successful brownfield redevelopment initiatives
  • How strong partnerships with stakeholders are vital to brownfield redevelopment
  • How the city set its risk tolerance in acquiring a contaminated site  

Speakers

  • Bill Corsan, Manager, Real Estate — City of Nanaimo, BC
  • Darren Moss, Chair of Planning, Design & Development Committee — Downtown Nanaimo BIA, and Professional Engineer, Tectonica

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Webinar recording: Opportunities and best practices in climate change action

Are you an elected official looking for a clear understanding of why your municipality should focus on climate change? Are you wondering how and where to start? 

This introductory webinar explores how Canada's climate is changing and the challenges and opportunities this creates for municipalities. Learn ways you can champion climate change action in your community and how you can gain support for climate related initiatives from internal and external stakeholders. 

Discover how Leduc, AB is adapting to climate change impacts and how they gained support to develop their Weather and Climate Readiness Action Plan. Hear about the steps Oxford County, ON took to gain support from their council for a resolution that would move them to 100% renewable energy by 2050.

This webinar is intended for elected officials from Canadian communities of all sizes.

What you will learn:

  • Understand the challenges that climate change represents for municipalities
  • Recognize the benefits of taking action on climate change in your municipality
  • Learn ways to get support for climate related initiatives from internal and external stakeholders

Speakers:

  • Bob Young, Mayor, Leduc, AB
  • Trevor Birtch, Mayor, Woodstock, ON

Read the transcript

 

Case study: Saint John explores options for district energy system

Feasibility Study for a Green Thermal Utility (GTU) District Heating and Cooling Loop in Downtown Saint John

City of Saint John

The City of Saint John studied the feasibility of a district energy system to serve buildings in the downtown area. These systems distribute thermal energy from a central facility to heat and cool multiple buildings.

Saint John's study examined various energy options including raw sewage heat recovery from the nearby waste water treatment plant and energy recovery from  Saint John Harbour seawater and industrial waste. In the end, the recommended approach was to use waste energy from the nearby Irving pulp and paper mill. Initially, 15 buildings would be connected. The district energy system would reduce energy costs, greenhouse-gas emissions and the city's fossil-fuel dependency. It would also encourage the development of green buildings in the heart of the city.

Results

Environmental Economic Social
  • GHG emissions reduced by 9,500 tonnes per year
  • Reduced reliance on fossil fuels
  • Annual energy savings of $2.2 million
  • Six full-time operations jobs and 200 construction jobs
  • Green development revitalizes the downtown core
  • Building residents enjoy the lack of boilers, furnaces and other equipment

Challenges

  • The lack of a project champion in city government and limited city staffing capacity to oversee the study.
  • Limited understanding of the potential of a district energy system among property managers and owners.
  • Financial constraints at the city, which put the district energy system project on hold in 2011.

Lessons learned

  • Visit district energy sites in other municipalities and consult with managers, designers and developers to clearly understand the potential of these systems.
  • Develop a master community energy plan to list local energy sources, buildings and future infrastructure projects before undertaking this kind of study.
  • Consult early and often with the public and local developers and property managers throughout the project.

Resources

Partners and Collaborators

Project Contact

Samir Yammine
Energy Manager
City of Saint John, NB
T. 506-648-4667

Case study: Saint John explores options for district energy system

Feasibility Study for a Green Thermal Utility (GTU) District Heating and Cooling Loop in Downtown Saint John

City of Saint John

The City of Saint John studied the feasibility of a district energy system to serve buildings in the downtown area. These systems distribute thermal energy from a central facility to heat and cool multiple buildings.

Saint John's study examined various energy options including raw sewage heat recovery from the nearby waste water treatment plant and energy recovery from  Saint John Harbour seawater and industrial waste. In the end, the recommended approach was to use waste energy from the nearby Irving pulp and paper mill. Initially, 15 buildings would be connected. The district energy system would reduce energy costs, greenhouse-gas emissions and the city's fossil-fuel dependency. It would also encourage the development of green buildings in the heart of the city.

Results

Environmental Economic Social
  • GHG emissions reduced by 9,500 tonnes per year
  • Reduced reliance on fossil fuels
  • Annual energy savings of $2.2 million
  • Six full-time operations jobs and 200 construction jobs
  • Green development revitalizes the downtown core
  • Building residents enjoy the lack of boilers, furnaces and other equipment

Challenges

  • The lack of a project champion in city government and limited city staffing capacity to oversee the study.
  • Limited understanding of the potential of a district energy system among property managers and owners.
  • Financial constraints at the city, which put the district energy system project on hold in 2011.

Lessons learned

  • Visit district energy sites in other municipalities and consult with managers, designers and developers to clearly understand the potential of these systems.
  • Develop a master community energy plan to list local energy sources, buildings and future infrastructure projects before undertaking this kind of study.
  • Consult early and often with the public and local developers and property managers throughout the project.

Resources

Partners and Collaborators

Project Contact

Samir Yammine
Energy Manager
City of Saint John, NB
T. 506-648-4667

City-led economic development and entrepreneurship: The story of Mr. Ngan

City-led economic development and entrepreneurship: The story of Mr. NganThis article is part of a series written to highlight some of the success stories from FCM’s Municipal Partners for Economic Development (MPED) program. MPED projects seeks to improve local governance and economic policy development around the world while, at the same time, emphasizing the importance of gender equality and environmental sustainability. From 2011 to 2014, the Township of Langley, Canada, worked with the City of Hà T˜ınh, Vietnam, to support and improve local economic development (LED) in Hà T˜ınh.

Download the document

 

What we do
Explore these key areas to find out how we’re helping to build stronger communities—and a better Canada.
Library books.
Resources

This library contains reports, toolkits, recommendations and other resources that are designed to help you address challenges in your community.

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Funding

We’ve got you covered with the right type of funding, from plans and studies, to pilots, capital projects and more.

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Focus areas

Learn how we’re working with local governments of all sizes to tackle national and global challenges.

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Programs

Increasing sustainability and enhancing the quality of life for people across Canada and around the world.

Canadian municipalities benefit with FCM

FCM works on behalf of 2,000+ member municipalities to shape the national agenda, and delivers tools that empower local governments. Together, we are building stronger communities—and a better Canada.

2019 Federation of Canadian Municipalities