Budget 2019

Budget 2019: a turning point for cities and communities

Budget 2019 delivers major results for Canadians—directly through their local governments. From doubling this year’s federal Gas Tax Fund transfer to prioritizing universal broadband, this budget elevates the federal-municipal partnership as the way to build better lives.

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Featured news and resources

FCM’s programs and advocacy help secure new tools that empower municipalities to build stronger communities of all sizes. Explore below to find out what’s new with us.

Roll of Honour

FCM honours the true difference-makers of local government with our Roll of Honour Awards. These awards pays tribute to FCM officers, and to officials of member municipalities and municipal associations who have made an outstanding contribution to FCM and to municipal government in Canada. You can read more about eligibility criteria here.

Current recipients

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen was elected councillor in the City of Saint-Laurent, Quebec, in 1982, and continued to serve there for 35 years. Through his nine terms in office, his commitment to community service strengthened a range of committees and boards, including economic development, urban planning and intercultural relations.

From Montreal’s first-ever French-language Jewish public school, which he helped found, to Saint-Laurent’s well-loved sports complex, which he championed, Mr. Cohen has left a lasting mark on his community. Nationally, he leaves no less of a mark on FCM, where he served on the Board of Directors for a remarkable 17 years and was known for his enthusiasm and ability to bring people together.

 

Pauline Quinlan

In 1998, Pauline Quinlan became the first woman ever elected mayor of Bromont, Quebec.

Through five consecutive mandates, she earned a reputation for tackling tough economic challenges—for a community that doubled in population under her leadership. Her countless contributions include spearheading the Bromont Economic Development Corporation, increasing the profile of Bromont Science Park, and implementing a 20-year sustainable development plan.

Ms. Quinlan brought that same record of results to FCM’s Board of Directors where she served from 2003 to 2017. Recently, as co-chair of FCM’s National Municipal Rail Safety Working Group, her leadership helped shape critical improvements across the country—and earned her the position of co-chair of the national Railway Safety Act Review Panel.

 

oger Anderson

Roger Anderson

First elected councillor in the Town of Ajax, Ontario, in 1985, Roger Anderson went on to serve as Ajax Deputy Mayor in 1991 before taking up the role of Durham Regional Chair in 1997. He went on become Durham’s longest serving regional chair until his passing in 2018.

Mr. Anderson dedicated his life to public service, serving as a police constable before becoming a public official. His dedication to local government—and its capacity to build better lives—made him an important figure at FCM, where he was a long-time Board member and instrumental in building several programs. He was especially proud of his formative role in our Ukraine program and the difference it has made for people on the ground.

 

Past recipients

2018

  • Pam McConnell — former Councillor, Toronto, ON

2017

  • Hazel McCallion — former Mayor, Mississauga, ON
  • Brad Woodside — former Mayor, Fredericton, NB; former FCM President
  • Russ Powers — former Councillor, Dundas, ON, and Hamilton, ON; former President, Association of Municipalities of Ontario; former FCM Director
  • Debra Button — former Councillor and Mayor, Weyburn, SK; former President, Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association; former FCM director
  • Joanne Monaghan — former Councillor and Mayor, Kitimat, BC; former President, Union of BC Municipalities; former FCM President

2016

  • Lise Burcher — former Councillor, Guelph, ON; former FCM Director
  • Don Forfar — former Mayor, St. Andrews, MB; former FCM Director

2015

  • Karen Leibovici — former FCM President, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Doug Reycraft — former FCM Board member, former AMO President
  • Basil Stewart — former FCM President, former Mayor of Summerside

2014

  • Colette Roy-Laroche — former Mayor of Lac-Mégantic
  • Graham Letto — former Mayor and former Councillor, Labrador City

2013

  • Yvette Hayden (Gonzalez) — former Northwest Territories Association of Communities CEO
  • Gordon Van Tighem — former FCM Director, former Mayor of Yellowknife, former Northwest Territories Association of Communities President
  • Big Cities Mayors' Caucus — David Miller, former Mayor of Toronto, Dave Bronconnier, former Mayor of Calgary, Senator Larry Campbell, former Mayor of Vancouver, Ann-Marie DeCicco-Best, former Mayor of London, Pat Fiacco, former Mayor of Regina and former FCM Big City Mayors' Caucus Chair

2012

  • Jim Green — former FCM Director, former Vancouver Councillor
  • Gord Steeves — former FCM President, former Winnipeg Councillor
  • Michael Phair — former FCM Director, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Mel Kositsky — former FCM Director, former Langley Councillor
  • Michael Power— former FCM Director, former AMO President, Geraldton
  • James W. Knight — former FCM Chief Executive Officer

Roll of Honour

FCM honours the true difference-makers of local government with our Roll of Honour Awards. These awards pays tribute to FCM officers, and to officials of member municipalities and municipal associations who have made an outstanding contribution to FCM and to municipal government in Canada. You can read more about eligibility criteria here.

Current recipients

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen

Maurice Cohen was elected councillor in the City of Saint-Laurent, Quebec, in 1982, and continued to serve there for 35 years. Through his nine terms in office, his commitment to community service strengthened a range of committees and boards, including economic development, urban planning and intercultural relations.

From Montreal’s first-ever French-language Jewish public school, which he helped found, to Saint-Laurent’s well-loved sports complex, which he championed, Mr. Cohen has left a lasting mark on his community. Nationally, he leaves no less of a mark on FCM, where he served on the Board of Directors for a remarkable 17 years and was known for his enthusiasm and ability to bring people together.

 

Pauline Quinlan

In 1998, Pauline Quinlan became the first woman ever elected mayor of Bromont, Quebec.

Through five consecutive mandates, she earned a reputation for tackling tough economic challenges—for a community that doubled in population under her leadership. Her countless contributions include spearheading the Bromont Economic Development Corporation, increasing the profile of Bromont Science Park, and implementing a 20-year sustainable development plan.

Ms. Quinlan brought that same record of results to FCM’s Board of Directors where she served from 2003 to 2017. Recently, as co-chair of FCM’s National Municipal Rail Safety Working Group, her leadership helped shape critical improvements across the country—and earned her the position of co-chair of the national Railway Safety Act Review Panel.

 

oger Anderson

Roger Anderson

First elected councillor in the Town of Ajax, Ontario, in 1985, Roger Anderson went on to serve as Ajax Deputy Mayor in 1991 before taking up the role of Durham Regional Chair in 1997. He went on become Durham’s longest serving regional chair until his passing in 2018.

Mr. Anderson dedicated his life to public service, serving as a police constable before becoming a public official. His dedication to local government—and its capacity to build better lives—made him an important figure at FCM, where he was a long-time Board member and instrumental in building several programs. He was especially proud of his formative role in our Ukraine program and the difference it has made for people on the ground.

 

Past recipients

2018

  • Pam McConnell — former Councillor, Toronto, ON

2017

  • Hazel McCallion — former Mayor, Mississauga, ON
  • Brad Woodside — former Mayor, Fredericton, NB; former FCM President
  • Russ Powers — former Councillor, Dundas, ON, and Hamilton, ON; former President, Association of Municipalities of Ontario; former FCM Director
  • Debra Button — former Councillor and Mayor, Weyburn, SK; former President, Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association; former FCM director
  • Joanne Monaghan — former Councillor and Mayor, Kitimat, BC; former President, Union of BC Municipalities; former FCM President

2016

  • Lise Burcher — former Councillor, Guelph, ON; former FCM Director
  • Don Forfar — former Mayor, St. Andrews, MB; former FCM Director

2015

  • Karen Leibovici — former FCM President, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Doug Reycraft — former FCM Board member, former AMO President
  • Basil Stewart — former FCM President, former Mayor of Summerside

2014

  • Colette Roy-Laroche — former Mayor of Lac-Mégantic
  • Graham Letto — former Mayor and former Councillor, Labrador City

2013

  • Yvette Hayden (Gonzalez) — former Northwest Territories Association of Communities CEO
  • Gordon Van Tighem — former FCM Director, former Mayor of Yellowknife, former Northwest Territories Association of Communities President
  • Big Cities Mayors' Caucus — David Miller, former Mayor of Toronto, Dave Bronconnier, former Mayor of Calgary, Senator Larry Campbell, former Mayor of Vancouver, Ann-Marie DeCicco-Best, former Mayor of London, Pat Fiacco, former Mayor of Regina and former FCM Big City Mayors' Caucus Chair

2012

  • Jim Green — former FCM Director, former Vancouver Councillor
  • Gord Steeves — former FCM President, former Winnipeg Councillor
  • Michael Phair — former FCM Director, former Edmonton Councillor
  • Mel Kositsky — former FCM Director, former Langley Councillor
  • Michael Power— former FCM Director, former AMO President, Geraldton
  • James W. Knight — former FCM Chief Executive Officer

Community Branding and Marketing - A tool for local economic development

Community Branding and Marketing - A tool for local economic developmentThis learning module and toolkit focuses on community branding and marketing—an important part of any local economic development strategy. The curriculum highlights the methodology and processes necessary to identify, articulate and launch a community brand. Developed in collaboration with overseas partners, the curriculum is based on best practices and the real-life experience of Canadian and other communities worldwide. It has now been taught and implemented in numerous partner cities.


This learning module and toolkit provides a self-guided learning experience using PowerPoint presentations, international and Canadian case studies, video footage and other resources. We encourage you to work through the content at your own pace, using whatever elements are applicable to your needs. Keep in mind that community branding and marketing is only a part of, and must be soundly rooted in, a comprehensive LED strategy.

 

Request this resource

Would you like to receive this resource by email? Contact us today. In your request, please include the full name of the resource.

Community Branding and Marketing - A tool for local economic development

Community Branding and Marketing - A tool for local economic developmentThis learning module and toolkit focuses on community branding and marketing—an important part of any local economic development strategy. The curriculum highlights the methodology and processes necessary to identify, articulate and launch a community brand. Developed in collaboration with overseas partners, the curriculum is based on best practices and the real-life experience of Canadian and other communities worldwide. It has now been taught and implemented in numerous partner cities.


This learning module and toolkit provides a self-guided learning experience using PowerPoint presentations, international and Canadian case studies, video footage and other resources. We encourage you to work through the content at your own pace, using whatever elements are applicable to your needs. Keep in mind that community branding and marketing is only a part of, and must be soundly rooted in, a comprehensive LED strategy.

 

Request this resource

Would you like to receive this resource by email? Contact us today. In your request, please include the full name of the resource.

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Published: April 2018 - PDF (1.2 MB)

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

A roadmap for Canadian local governments

Canadians care about the impact of cannabis legalization and municipal governments will be the first place they turn to if they have concerns. Developing the rules and processes that will govern the legalization of non-medical cannabis is a complex task. Municipalities will need to make critical decisions about how and when to write new bylaws on a range of issues including land use planning, business licensing and public consumption.

FCM designed the Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization to provide an overview of the work ahead for local governments and offer both policy and regulatory options to choose from. It will take coordinated effort from all orders of government to ensure that Canadians are safe and well-served during the process of cannabis legalization. This guide can help communities get it right.

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Published: April 2018 - PDF (1.2 MB)

Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

A roadmap for Canadian local governments

Canadians care about the impact of cannabis legalization and municipal governments will be the first place they turn to if they have concerns. Developing the rules and processes that will govern the legalization of non-medical cannabis is a complex task. Municipalities will need to make critical decisions about how and when to write new bylaws on a range of issues including land use planning, business licensing and public consumption.

FCM designed the Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization to provide an overview of the work ahead for local governments and offer both policy and regulatory options to choose from. It will take coordinated effort from all orders of government to ensure that Canadians are safe and well-served during the process of cannabis legalization. This guide can help communities get it right.

Cannabis legalization: Municipalities key to keeping Canadians safe and well-served

Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) President Vicki-May Hamm issued the following statement to mark the legalization of non-medical cannabis across Canada today.

“Today marks a significant shift in how our society operates. From public safety to retail services, to transit and labour law, keeping Canadians safe and well-served in a world of legal cannabis will require significant coordination among all orders of government.

“Local governments are on the front lines of cannabis legalization. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has been helping cities and communities get ready nationwide by providing tools and engaging our various partners. We also know that keeping Canadians safe and well-served will require a clear framework for sharing the costs that come with this new policy.

“Legalization has operational and cost implications for as many as 17 municipal departments. This is why the federal government also released half of its share of cannabis excise tax revenues to provinces and territories—to support municipalities. Yet, only three provinces have revealed plans to share those funds with local governments. Too many of our members across Canada do not have any clarity on how cannabis costs will be covered through provincial revenue sharing frameworks. As the lead on cannabis legalization, the Government of Canada will need to ensure adequate revenue-sharing plans are in place and municipalities are made whole for the costs of this federal policy.

“In September 2017, the federal government also committed $81 million to help our local police services manage a reality of legal cannabis—including through training and technology to tackle drug-impaired driving. Yet as legalization day comes and goes, we are still waiting for details on how this support will flow.

“Local governments have been hard at work changing bylaws, building capacity and engaging citizens to get ready for legalization. Canadians can count on local leaders to be ready to adapt to challenges on the road ahead. One challenge we cannot tackle alone, however, is ensuring local costs are fully and sustainably covered for this new federal initiative.

“Safe and effective cannabis legalization requires collaboration across orders of government and municipalities are ready to do their part. We all need to work together to get this right.”

Vicki-May Hamm is President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) and Mayor of the City of Magog, Quebec. FCM is the national voice of local government, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of Canada’s population.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Cannabis

Statement from Mayor Don Iveson, Chair of FCM’s Big City Mayors’ Caucus

“To see a Canadian province invoke the Notwithstanding Clause to change the size of a city council, in the middle of an election campaign, is unprecedented. On behalf of FCM’s Big City Mayors’ Caucus, I am offering full support to the City of Toronto’s efforts to protect local democracy.

“Canadians are now stuck in a Constitutional debate, when we have not even tested the limits of how governments can work together within the Constitution. The levers to modernize the relationship already exist.

“Certainly, there is nothing unconstitutional about sitting down together to talk about solving problems, funding cities mandates directly, and creating a forum where municipal governments address our nation’s challenges with their provincial and federal counterparts as equals. It just takes political will from every order of government.

“Mayors are pragmatists. Every day, municipal governments are delivering city-based solutions to national challenges, from economic productivity to public safety. And increasingly, Canadians expect us to share the lead on emerging challenges—from stemming the opioid crisis, to building innovative economies, to settling new Canadians in our communities. 

“It is time for a mature, modern conversation about how we work together to make life better for Canadians. Canada’s mayors are ready.”

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is the national voice of municipal governments, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of the Canadian population.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Big City Mayors' Caucus

Sustainable Communities Awards

Since 2001, these awards have celebrated the most innovative environmental initiatives in Canadian cities and communities of all sizes. The winning projects demonstrate sustainability best practices you can apply to similar initiatives in your community. These awards are presented biannually to outstanding municipal projects in several categories:

  • Asset management
  • Brownfields
  • Climate change
  • Energy
  • Sustainable neighbourhood revitalization and design
  • Transportation
  • Waste
  • Water

Winners in each category are nominated for the Inspire Award, which is given to the project that demonstrates the most creativity and innovation.

Opioid announcement advances urgently needed action

"Canada's opioid crisis continues at a horrifying pace. The families, front-line workers, volunteers and communities enduring the worst of this emergency deserve action from all orders of government. And with an estimated 3,000 opioid-related deaths expected this year alone, the urgency of response is clear. 

"Wednesday's announcement by the Minster of Health to move to expand treatment options and reduce barriers and support those fighting on the frontlines of the crisis is an important step  forward. Authorizing drug-checking services at supervised consumption sites, easing legislative barriers to establishing overdose prevention sites and commitments to develop peer-driven public awareness campaigns respond directly to some of the Big City Mayors' Caucus' recommendations released earlier this year. 

"There is still significant work ahead to ensure a coordinated national response by all orders of government, including municipalities and Indigenous communities. Federal leadership is urgently needed to establish comprehensive timelines, measures and evidenced-based targets for the harm reduction, treatment, prevention and enforcement responses to the overdose crisis. An intergovernmental plan must align actions and resources with the essential work on the ground and respond to the specific needs of municipalities and Indigenous communities.

"Being on the front lines of this crisis, Canada's cities have consistently called for all orders of government to be working together in a co-ordinated, pan-Canadian response to end this tragic epidemic. 

"As we recognize the progress in Wednesday's announcement, we also look forward to meeting with the Health Minister to further align our actions to solve this national health crisis."

The BCMC Task Force on the Opioid Crisis convenes mayors of 13 cities: Vancouver, Surrey, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton, London, Kitchener, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal. The Task Force was launched on February 3, 2017, by the Big-City Mayors' Caucus of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

Media Contact

Question for press and media?

613-907-6395
Big City Mayors' Caucus
Opioid crisis
Public safety
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Explore these key areas to find out how we’re helping to build stronger communities—and a better Canada.
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This library contains reports, toolkits, recommendations and other resources that are designed to help you address challenges in your community.

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FCM works on behalf of 2,000+ member municipalities to shape the national agenda, and delivers tools that empower local governments. Together, we are building stronger communities—and a better Canada.

2019 Federation of Canadian Municipalities