Featured news and resources

FCM’s programs and advocacy help secure new tools that empower municipalities to build stronger communities of all sizes. Explore below to find out what’s new with us.

Case study: Nova Scotia's longest paved bike path in Cape Breton

Project type Amount Community
Capital project

Loan: $1 million
Grant: $100,000

Sydney and Glace Bay, NS

 

Cape breton bike path

 

Bike paths are an anomaly in Nova Scotia, and this project was the largest component of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality's (CBRM) Active Transportation (AT) plan. In 2007–2008, it carried out public consultations, including focus groups, five public open houses and an online survey. An advisory committee met regularly after the study to monitor the project's progress. Its representatives included:

  • The municipality
  • The Nova Scotia Department of Transportation
  • Velo Cape Breton
  • The Regional Health Authority
  • Mayflower Mall 
  • Cape Breton University
  • Heart and Stroke Foundation

The path is expected to:

  • Remove 1,240 vehicles from the road
  • Reduce vehicle kilometres travelled by 7,936,000 per year
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1.5 million kg of CO2e per year
  • Stimulate economic growth by increasing interaction between Sydney and Glace Bay, as well as the university
  • Serve approximately 4,000 students and 450 staff at the university
  • Serve approximately 1,400 students and 170 staff at the Nova Scotia Community College (Marconi Campus)

Cape breton bike path

Many of their design suggestions were incorporated into the final plan

The 10-kilometre multi-use path links Sydney, Glace Bay and Cape Breton University. It's an off-road, AT corridor, where people can walk, bike, inline skate or skateboard with minimal vehicular interactions. It's a safe alternative transportation route in a corridor that was previously served only by the Grand Lake Road–a four-lane highway. The pathway is wheelchair accessible.

"I think this project truly showed that we can make huge improvements in our communities if we apply ourselves and commit to the implementation of our AT plan. My hope is that people will realize the potential we have in regards to converting existing rail beds and trails into functioning AT corridors."

– Malcolm Roach, Operations Supervisor, Public Works East, New Waterford and Area, Cape Breton Regional Municipality

This new route will enhance Mayflower Mall's economic viability by connecting it to nearby residential areas. It's the region's largest shopping centre. The 570 students living on campus can now access shopping and employment opportunities by bicycle, reducing their personal travel costs. Other students and university employees from Sydney and Glace Bay can now bike to campus.

"The feedback from our membership has been overwhelmingly positive... Though designed as a transportation corridor, it is proving to be recreational, especially for new cyclists and families with young cyclists."

– Andree Crepeau, Vice-President, Velo Cape Breton

Additional resources 

Case study: Improving health and comfort for residents in the GTA

Project type Amount Community

Capital project

Grant: $750,000 
Loan: $5 million 

Toronto and Hamilton, ON

The Atmospheric Fund (TAF) event
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Julia Langer, CEO, TAF at the podium; Kevin Marshman, CEO,
Toronto Community Housing Corporation; Marco Mendicino, MP and Parliamentary Secretary
to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; Toronto-Danforth MP Julia Dabrusin;
Toronto Mayor John Tory; Kitchener Mayor Berry Vrbanovic

Nearly 44 per cent of people in urban areas live in apartments and condos, as stated in a report by the The Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF). If retrofitted to become more energy-efficient, these types of buildings could support national efforts to reduce GHG emissions. A key barrier is the lack of information available to support the technical and economic feasibility of these types of projects. The Accelerating Deep Energy Retrofits (ADER) project is changing that. 

TAF, in partnership with the City of Toronto, is working to implement retrofits to four multi-residential buildings in the downtown Toronto area and in the City of Hamilton. The buildings, totaling 791 households, represent a range of ownership structures and residents, from young families to seniors, and include:

  • Rental apartments
  • A condominium 
  • Two low-income social housing buildings

The City of Hamilton will help develop lessons learned and best practices for future scale-up efforts, and will add a multi-unit residential complex to the initiative. 

“We’re excited about this project’s ability to accelerate the adoption of retrofits around the country. My favourite thing about it is the opportunity to improve health and comfort for building residents, even as we reduce energy costs and carbon emissions. For example, heat pump technology not only dramatically reduces heating energy use, it also provides highly efficient air conditioning.”  

—Bryan Purcell, Vice-President, Policy and Programs, The Toronto Atmospheric Fund 

The average number of days above 30˚C in the Toronto area has increased by more than 50 per cent. This means residents of older, multi-family buildings are increasingly exposed to unhealthy temperature extremes. This project aims to dramatically reduce this type of exposure. TAF has already installed air-source heat pumps at two sites in the past year and has undertaken design work on the remaining buildings. These deep energy retrofits can reduce operating costs, improve indoor environmental quality and resident comfort and create local jobs. 

“This is the best thing that has been done for [our] housing. It lowers [our] energy bills, provides heating and cooling. It's a lot colder in the summer and a lot warmer in the winter. You have more freedom and control,” says Diane Laidley, a resident at one of the Toronto ADER sites. 

As a way to see firsthand how residents can benefit from the heating and cooling retrofits, TAF will also undertake a comprehensive monitoring and verification process to help ensure that the expected energy savings continue to materialize throughout the newly installed systems’ lifecycles. 

The participants will widely share the knowledge gained from these projects through case studies, white papers and presentations. 

This project will:

  • Reduce GHG emissions by 546 tonnes C02e/year 
  • Reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions in the four buildings by at least 40 percent
  • Reduce water consumption with the installation of new low-flow fixtures and ultra-low-flow toilets 

Additional resources 

Case study: BC community centre supports families and children

Project type Grant amount Community
Feasibility study $21,300 City of Maple Ridge, BC

Albion community centre and school


When the City of Maple Ridge saw a need for improved and sustainable recreational services, it birthed the idea of a community centre in the Albion area. Around the same time, the school district was preparing to start public consultations for a new 500+ student elementary school. And so, a joint planning and consultation process began. It emphasized shared space, a connection to nature and a green building design with an educational component. 

The city completed a GMF-funded study to determine the technical and financial feasibility of implementing energy efficiency guidelines for the centre. This study was a result of an extensive community-wide consultation, including:

  • An open house 
  • Neighbourhood workshops with students
  • Interviews with major stakeholders, including the Katzie and Kwantlen First Nations, School District, Metro Vancouver Regional District and facility operators 
  • A series of community-wide surveys 
  • 25 community partner outreach meetings 
  • Information sharing through local media, the city and school district’s websites and social media platforms

This feasibility study allowed the community to develop:

  • A review of net-energy reduction in a building that is atypical and doesn’t meet various sustainable program standards 
  • Energy modeling that determined how changes in architectural, mechanical and electrical systems would impact the building’s cost and performance 
  • An exploration and understanding of sustainability paths that allowed the city council to make better funding decisions

Albion community centre

The city investigated four highly reputable programs currently in place to advance green building in British Columbia. Given the limitations of this location (i.e., it is remote and certain codes don’t apply to institutional buildings), it became clear that a LEED Silver certification was likely the highest level the building could achieve. The results suggested that the new design would use 62 per cent less energy than a baseline building designed to minimum code standards. 


“To me, the best part about this project is the interface between the elementary school and the green building education. This centre is also an example of the great partnership between the school and the city, and is one of our many mutual projects. In the long run, it will save taxpayer dollars and provide better services to the community.”

–Don Cramb, Senior Recreation Manager, Maple Ridge Parks, Recreation & Culture 

The community voiced its strong support for the concept of a co-located elementary school and neighbourhood community centre. The designers focused on incorporating the existing landscape into the design and showcased some sustainable approaches as part of its educational approach. The centre will also serve as a major node to natural trail connections in the surrounding riparian area. 


“I think the centre will enhance our community greatly… There is an overall need in the area to support children and families, so it is really wonderful to see these synergies.” 

–Rick Delorme, Director of Maintenance and Facilities, School District 42 Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows

Additional resources 

Case study: Quebec community serves as a model zero-waste example

Project type Grant amount Community
Pilot project $32,700 Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie, Montréal, QC

Montreal Zero Waste Challenge participants
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Roxanne Comtois, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre, Laure Caillot, specialist, Défi zéro déchet, and Claudette Therrien, representative of a Défi zéro déchet centre.

Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie is a densely populated central part of Montréal with nearly 140,000 residents. In 2016, 63 per cent of its household garbage ended up in a landfill, so the borough developed the Défi zéro déchet (Zero Waste Challenge) to reduce that number.

The program was inspired by the concept of zero waste, a movement that is gaining momentum in Quebec and other cities around the world, which focuses on five principles: 

  • Refuse
  • Reduce
  • Reuse
  • Recycle 
  • Compost

This pilot project should: 

  • Reduce household waste by 30 to 50 per cent (i.e., reduce the waste per person, per year by 109 to 181 kg)
  • Reduce 16,390 tonnes in household waste per year at the district level, in the long term

People on a stage talking at the Zero Waste Challenge panel
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Gabrielle Lamontagne-Hallé, Amélie Côté, Laure Caillot, Bchira Dhouib, Douglas Besson

Out of 569 applications, 50 households participated in the pilot between October 2018 and June 2019, and each one weighed its waste throughout the project. The organizers also recruited three professional zero-waste specialists, who worked closely with each household.

“Midway through the project, the volunteers had reduced their waste by 20 per cent on average—a remarkable outcome four months into the challenge,” states Marilou Deschênes, a Sustainable Development Research Officer of the borough.

“The Zero Waste Challenge, as small as it may seem, has enormous potential to turn Montréal into a sustainable city. The fact that the project was so popular shows that municipalities have a role to play in helping residents transition to a low-impact lifestyle.”

—Marilou Deschênes, Sustainable Development Research Officer, Communications Division, Borough of Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie

Participants were offered support activities based on their needs, including telephone support, individual and group meetings, special thematic workshops and a private Facebook group. The public could access information about the participants on a website, along with their testimonies, goals and achievements.

The borough estimates that in its first edition, Défi zéro déchet will reduce the total household waste generated by 10 to 17 tonnes.

Overall, the goal of the challenge is to position borough citizens as leaders in reducing waste before it goes to landfills. The pilot aims to test an innovative solution that is replicable and inspires other communities. 

“During the challenge, I was able to enjoy workshops and the feeling that I was part of a community, with all the support that entails. …  My responsible consumption is my own contribution to the fight against climate change.”

Jean Gagnon Doré, Défi zéro déchet participant

Additional resources 

Case study: Nova Scotia's longest paved bike path in Cape Breton

Project type Amount Community
Capital project

Loan: $1 million
Grant: $100,000

Sydney and Glace Bay, NS

 

Cape breton bike path

 

Bike paths are an anomaly in Nova Scotia, and this project was the largest component of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality's (CBRM) Active Transportation (AT) plan. In 2007–2008, it carried out public consultations, including focus groups, five public open houses and an online survey. An advisory committee met regularly after the study to monitor the project's progress. Its representatives included:

  • The municipality
  • The Nova Scotia Department of Transportation
  • Velo Cape Breton
  • The Regional Health Authority
  • Mayflower Mall 
  • Cape Breton University
  • Heart and Stroke Foundation

The path is expected to:

  • Remove 1,240 vehicles from the road
  • Reduce vehicle kilometres travelled by 7,936,000 per year
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1.5 million kg of CO2e per year
  • Stimulate economic growth by increasing interaction between Sydney and Glace Bay, as well as the university
  • Serve approximately 4,000 students and 450 staff at the university
  • Serve approximately 1,400 students and 170 staff at the Nova Scotia Community College (Marconi Campus)

Cape breton bike path

Many of their design suggestions were incorporated into the final plan

The 10-kilometre multi-use path links Sydney, Glace Bay and Cape Breton University. It's an off-road, AT corridor, where people can walk, bike, inline skate or skateboard with minimal vehicular interactions. It's a safe alternative transportation route in a corridor that was previously served only by the Grand Lake Road–a four-lane highway. The pathway is wheelchair accessible.

"I think this project truly showed that we can make huge improvements in our communities if we apply ourselves and commit to the implementation of our AT plan. My hope is that people will realize the potential we have in regards to converting existing rail beds and trails into functioning AT corridors."

– Malcolm Roach, Operations Supervisor, Public Works East, New Waterford and Area, Cape Breton Regional Municipality

This new route will enhance Mayflower Mall's economic viability by connecting it to nearby residential areas. It's the region's largest shopping centre. The 570 students living on campus can now access shopping and employment opportunities by bicycle, reducing their personal travel costs. Other students and university employees from Sydney and Glace Bay can now bike to campus.

"The feedback from our membership has been overwhelmingly positive... Though designed as a transportation corridor, it is proving to be recreational, especially for new cyclists and families with young cyclists."

– Andree Crepeau, Vice-President, Velo Cape Breton

Additional resources 

Case study: BC community centre supports families and children

Project type Grant amount Community
Feasibility study $21,300 City of Maple Ridge, BC

Albion community centre and school


When the City of Maple Ridge saw a need for improved and sustainable recreational services, it birthed the idea of a community centre in the Albion area. Around the same time, the school district was preparing to start public consultations for a new 500+ student elementary school. And so, a joint planning and consultation process began. It emphasized shared space, a connection to nature and a green building design with an educational component. 

The city completed a GMF-funded study to determine the technical and financial feasibility of implementing energy efficiency guidelines for the centre. This study was a result of an extensive community-wide consultation, including:

  • An open house 
  • Neighbourhood workshops with students
  • Interviews with major stakeholders, including the Katzie and Kwantlen First Nations, School District, Metro Vancouver Regional District and facility operators 
  • A series of community-wide surveys 
  • 25 community partner outreach meetings 
  • Information sharing through local media, the city and school district’s websites and social media platforms

This feasibility study allowed the community to develop:

  • A review of net-energy reduction in a building that is atypical and doesn’t meet various sustainable program standards 
  • Energy modeling that determined how changes in architectural, mechanical and electrical systems would impact the building’s cost and performance 
  • An exploration and understanding of sustainability paths that allowed the city council to make better funding decisions

Albion community centre

The city investigated four highly reputable programs currently in place to advance green building in British Columbia. Given the limitations of this location (i.e., it is remote and certain codes don’t apply to institutional buildings), it became clear that a LEED Silver certification was likely the highest level the building could achieve. The results suggested that the new design would use 62 per cent less energy than a baseline building designed to minimum code standards. 


“To me, the best part about this project is the interface between the elementary school and the green building education. This centre is also an example of the great partnership between the school and the city, and is one of our many mutual projects. In the long run, it will save taxpayer dollars and provide better services to the community.”

–Don Cramb, Senior Recreation Manager, Maple Ridge Parks, Recreation & Culture 

The community voiced its strong support for the concept of a co-located elementary school and neighbourhood community centre. The designers focused on incorporating the existing landscape into the design and showcased some sustainable approaches as part of its educational approach. The centre will also serve as a major node to natural trail connections in the surrounding riparian area. 


“I think the centre will enhance our community greatly… There is an overall need in the area to support children and families, so it is really wonderful to see these synergies.” 

–Rick Delorme, Director of Maintenance and Facilities, School District 42 Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows

Additional resources 

Case study: Improving health and comfort for residents in the GTA

Project type Amount Community

Capital project

Grant: $750,000 
Loan: $5 million 

Toronto and Hamilton, ON

The Atmospheric Fund (TAF) event
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Julia Langer, CEO, TAF at the podium; Kevin Marshman, CEO,
Toronto Community Housing Corporation; Marco Mendicino, MP and Parliamentary Secretary
to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; Toronto-Danforth MP Julia Dabrusin;
Toronto Mayor John Tory; Kitchener Mayor Berry Vrbanovic

Nearly 44 per cent of people in urban areas live in apartments and condos, as stated in a report by the The Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF). If retrofitted to become more energy-efficient, these types of buildings could support national efforts to reduce GHG emissions. A key barrier is the lack of information available to support the technical and economic feasibility of these types of projects. The Accelerating Deep Energy Retrofits (ADER) project is changing that. 

TAF, in partnership with the City of Toronto, is working to implement retrofits to four multi-residential buildings in the downtown Toronto area and in the City of Hamilton. The buildings, totaling 791 households, represent a range of ownership structures and residents, from young families to seniors, and include:

  • Rental apartments
  • A condominium 
  • Two low-income social housing buildings

The City of Hamilton will help develop lessons learned and best practices for future scale-up efforts, and will add a multi-unit residential complex to the initiative. 

“We’re excited about this project’s ability to accelerate the adoption of retrofits around the country. My favourite thing about it is the opportunity to improve health and comfort for building residents, even as we reduce energy costs and carbon emissions. For example, heat pump technology not only dramatically reduces heating energy use, it also provides highly efficient air conditioning.”  

—Bryan Purcell, Vice-President, Policy and Programs, The Toronto Atmospheric Fund 

The average number of days above 30˚C in the Toronto area has increased by more than 50 per cent. This means residents of older, multi-family buildings are increasingly exposed to unhealthy temperature extremes. This project aims to dramatically reduce this type of exposure. TAF has already installed air-source heat pumps at two sites in the past year and has undertaken design work on the remaining buildings. These deep energy retrofits can reduce operating costs, improve indoor environmental quality and resident comfort and create local jobs. 

“This is the best thing that has been done for [our] housing. It lowers [our] energy bills, provides heating and cooling. It's a lot colder in the summer and a lot warmer in the winter. You have more freedom and control,” says Diane Laidley, a resident at one of the Toronto ADER sites. 

As a way to see firsthand how residents can benefit from the heating and cooling retrofits, TAF will also undertake a comprehensive monitoring and verification process to help ensure that the expected energy savings continue to materialize throughout the newly installed systems’ lifecycles. 

The participants will widely share the knowledge gained from these projects through case studies, white papers and presentations. 

This project will:

  • Reduce GHG emissions by 546 tonnes C02e/year 
  • Reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions in the four buildings by at least 40 percent
  • Reduce water consumption with the installation of new low-flow fixtures and ultra-low-flow toilets 

Additional resources 

Municipalities across Canada to receive support for 67 new infrastructure initiatives

Investing in innovative green infrastructure projects contributes to a clean growth economy and strengthens the middle class by ensuring communities are healthy and sustainable places to live.

The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Jenny Gerbasi, President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) today announced funding for 67 initiatives in communities across Canada through three programs: the Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program (MCIP), the Municipal Asset Management Program (MAMP), and the Green Municipal Fund (GMF).

Improving Canada's infrastructure lays — in large part — in the hands of the municipalities. Communities across the country want to be sure they are investing their infrastructure money wisely, and that they are ready to adapt to the potential effects of climate change as they make local infrastructure investment decisions. The projects announced today demonstrate the work being done on these fronts in municipalities large and small.

For example, the City of Montreal, Quebec, is receiving funding through MCIP for a pilot project that will create green spaces in alleyways. Rooftop drains will be disconnected from sewer systems and excess rainwater will be used to water plants and walkways between buildings, improving both public and private spaces. This project could potentially divert the equivalent of two Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of water from the city's sewers.

Funding through MAMP is helping Canadian municipalities make informed decisions on infrastructure investments based on sound asset management practices. In Newfoundland, seven municipalities are receiving funding to train local officials on asset management planning, preparing a local inventory of assets, and reporting on the preliminary state of infrastructure. This training will help communities make informed investment decisions for infrastructure assets that will deliver value for money, while serving their citizens' needs.

Through GMF, communities are not only improving the environment around them, they are maximizing municipal resources and improving the lives of their citizens. The Township of Douro-Dummer, Ontario will study the feasibility of constructing a net-zero energy centralized public works and emergency services building, which would produce at least as much energy as it consumes on an annual basis. This initiative will provide an example for other small rural towns that want to improve and consolidate municipal infrastructure in environmentally sustainable ways.

MCIP, MAMP, and GMF are funded by the Government of Canada and delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

Quotes

These investments will help municipalities across the country to plan, build and maintain their infrastructure more strategically. Investments in green infrastructure projects help build healthy, liveable, cleaner, and more sustainable communities now and for future generations.
— The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Energy efficiency is one of the most effective ways to support the transition to a low-carbon economy and meet our future energy needs. Our Government is looking to achieve this is by working collaboratively with provinces, territories, and industry to create a national model net-zero energy-ready code for new homes and buildings by 2022. We are proud to support projects that are charting our course to the low-carbon future.
— The Honourable Jim Carr, Canada's Minister of Natural Resources

It's exciting to see so many municipalities — big and small — stepping up to do things differently. All three programs behind today's announcement are helping communities do just that and learn from each other along the way. We are proud to fund these initiatives and know that local action in communities across Canada is driving change on a national scale. Together, we're making real progress toward Canada's climate and sustainability goals.
— Jenny Gerbasi, FCM President

Quick facts

  • The Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program is a five-year, $75-million program designed to encourage Canadian municipalities to better prepare for and adapt to the new realities of climate change as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • The Municipal Asset Management Program is a five-year, $50-million program designed to help Canadian municipalities strengthen infrastructure investment decisions based on sound asset management practices.
  • The Green Municipal Fund is a program designed to support initiatives that demonstrate innovative solutions or approaches to a municipal environmental issue that can generate new lessons and models for communities of all sizes and types across Canada. The Government of Canada endowed FCM with $550 million to establish the program and an additional $125 million top-up was announced in Budget 2016.

Related product

Backgrounder: Municipalities to receive funding for 67 infrastructure initiatives across Canada

Associated links

Municipal Asset Management Program
Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program
Green Municipal Fund
FCM Funding
Government of Canada's $180 billion+ infrastructure plan

Contacts

Brook Simpson
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities
613-219-0149
brook.simpson@canada.ca  

FCM Media Relations
613-907-6395
media@fcm.ca  

Infrastructure Canada
613-960-9251
Toll free: 1-877-250-7154
media@infc.gc.ca
Twitter: @INFC_eng
Infrastructure Canada  

Natural Resources Canada
Media Relations
343-292-6100

Climate change
Environment
Infrastructure

Municipalities across Canada to receive support for 67 new infrastructure initiatives

Investing in innovative green infrastructure projects contributes to a clean growth economy and strengthens the middle class by ensuring communities are healthy and sustainable places to live.

The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Jenny Gerbasi, President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) today announced funding for 67 initiatives in communities across Canada through three programs: the Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program (MCIP), the Municipal Asset Management Program (MAMP), and the Green Municipal Fund (GMF).

Improving Canada's infrastructure lays — in large part — in the hands of the municipalities. Communities across the country want to be sure they are investing their infrastructure money wisely, and that they are ready to adapt to the potential effects of climate change as they make local infrastructure investment decisions. The projects announced today demonstrate the work being done on these fronts in municipalities large and small.

For example, the City of Montreal, Quebec, is receiving funding through MCIP for a pilot project that will create green spaces in alleyways. Rooftop drains will be disconnected from sewer systems and excess rainwater will be used to water plants and walkways between buildings, improving both public and private spaces. This project could potentially divert the equivalent of two Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of water from the city's sewers.

Funding through MAMP is helping Canadian municipalities make informed decisions on infrastructure investments based on sound asset management practices. In Newfoundland, seven municipalities are receiving funding to train local officials on asset management planning, preparing a local inventory of assets, and reporting on the preliminary state of infrastructure. This training will help communities make informed investment decisions for infrastructure assets that will deliver value for money, while serving their citizens' needs.

Through GMF, communities are not only improving the environment around them, they are maximizing municipal resources and improving the lives of their citizens. The Township of Douro-Dummer, Ontario will study the feasibility of constructing a net-zero energy centralized public works and emergency services building, which would produce at least as much energy as it consumes on an annual basis. This initiative will provide an example for other small rural towns that want to improve and consolidate municipal infrastructure in environmentally sustainable ways.

MCIP, MAMP, and GMF are funded by the Government of Canada and delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

Quotes

These investments will help municipalities across the country to plan, build and maintain their infrastructure more strategically. Investments in green infrastructure projects help build healthy, liveable, cleaner, and more sustainable communities now and for future generations.
— The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Energy efficiency is one of the most effective ways to support the transition to a low-carbon economy and meet our future energy needs. Our Government is looking to achieve this is by working collaboratively with provinces, territories, and industry to create a national model net-zero energy-ready code for new homes and buildings by 2022. We are proud to support projects that are charting our course to the low-carbon future.
— The Honourable Jim Carr, Canada's Minister of Natural Resources

It's exciting to see so many municipalities — big and small — stepping up to do things differently. All three programs behind today's announcement are helping communities do just that and learn from each other along the way. We are proud to fund these initiatives and know that local action in communities across Canada is driving change on a national scale. Together, we're making real progress toward Canada's climate and sustainability goals.
— Jenny Gerbasi, FCM President

Quick facts

  • The Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program is a five-year, $75-million program designed to encourage Canadian municipalities to better prepare for and adapt to the new realities of climate change as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • The Municipal Asset Management Program is a five-year, $50-million program designed to help Canadian municipalities strengthen infrastructure investment decisions based on sound asset management practices.
  • The Green Municipal Fund is a program designed to support initiatives that demonstrate innovative solutions or approaches to a municipal environmental issue that can generate new lessons and models for communities of all sizes and types across Canada. The Government of Canada endowed FCM with $550 million to establish the program and an additional $125 million top-up was announced in Budget 2016.

Related product

Backgrounder: Municipalities to receive funding for 67 infrastructure initiatives across Canada

Associated links

Municipal Asset Management Program
Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program
Green Municipal Fund
FCM Funding
Government of Canada's $180 billion+ infrastructure plan

Contacts

Brook Simpson
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities
613-219-0149
brook.simpson@canada.ca  

FCM Media Relations
613-907-6395
media@fcm.ca  

Infrastructure Canada
613-960-9251
Toll free: 1-877-250-7154
media@infc.gc.ca
Twitter: @INFC_eng
Infrastructure Canada  

Natural Resources Canada
Media Relations
343-292-6100

Climate change
Environment
Infrastructure

Rural challenges, national opportunity

Rural challenges, national opportunity

Published: May 2018 - PDF (4.2 MB)

Rural challenges, national opportunities

Shaping the future of rural Canada

Small-town friendliness. Vast landscapes. A quieter way of life. These are some of the reasons that people are drawn to smaller communities. And as online connectivity expands, rural Canada is becoming more appealing to businesses. 

In our report, Rural challenges, national opportunity: shaping the future of rural Canadawe showcase the successes and potential of Canada's smaller communities.

Rural communities help drive Canada's economy, but they also face unique challenges that need tailor-made policy and resource solutions. Our report shows how tackling these local challenges, from coast to coast to coast, is how we'll build this country. Throughout, we profile rural communities that are already showing tremendous resilience and ingenuity in leading the way.

The future of Canada will only get brighter if the federal government empowers rural municipalities with transformative tools that are adaptable to local needs. This will help build Canada, impacting people living in communities of all sizes.

FCM: rural advocates

FCM's Rural Forum continues to set an ambitious agenda for our federal advocacy. And in recent years, FCM has delivered unprecedented gains - including major rural-specific federal funding for infrastructure and other major projects. But there is more work to be done.

That's why FCM continues to work with the federal government to champion rural issues. We are working to build a "rural lens" into all federal policies and programs, to ensure we have the tools to build more sustainable and prosperous rural communities nationwide.

What we do
Explore these key areas to find out how we’re helping to build stronger communities—and a better Canada.
Library books.
Resources

This library contains reports, toolkits, recommendations and other resources that are designed to help you address challenges in your community.

jar of coins.
Funding

We’ve got you covered with the right type of funding, from plans and studies, to pilots, capital projects and more.

Close up of hands making frame gesture with sunrise.
Focus areas

Learn how we’re working with local governments of all sizes to tackle national and global challenges.

Aerial view of suburban houses
Programs

Increasing sustainability and enhancing the quality of life for people across Canada and around the world.

FCM makes communities stronger

FCM brings together nearly 2,000 municipalities of all sizes—representing more than 90 percent of Canadians. Together with our members, we’ve secured historic gains at the federal level—empowering local leaders to build better lives.

© 2019 Federation of Canadian Municipalities